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  1. It’s Capital! Understanding Latina/o Presence in Higher Education

    Latina/o educational differentials have been studied predominantly from a deficit standpoint that emphasizes a lack of cultural capital. More recently, researchers began to reject this deficit perspective, foregrounding instead the cultural capital that enables Latina/o students to succeed academically. The very idea that Latina/o students possess cultural capital is new to higher education, which has historically undervalued Latina/o student experience and community history. Cultural capital, however, plays a crucial role in Latina/o student academic achievement.
  2. Neighborhoods, Race, and the Twenty-first-century Housing Appraisal Industry

    The history of the U.S. housing market is bound up in systemic, explicit racism. However, little research has investigated whether racial inequality also persists in the contemporary appraisal industry and, if present, how it happens. The present article addresses this gap by centering the appraisal industry as a key housing market player in the reproduction of racial inequality.
  3. Black-white Biracial Students’ Evaluations of Blackness: The Role of College in Shaping Racial Regard

    This study explores biracial students’ racial regard, an evaluative component of racial identity that captures positive and negative feelings about the racial groups to which one belongs. Drawing on data from interviews with 62 black-white biracial students attending predominantly white institutions (PWIs) or historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), I explore the conditions of educational contexts that promote or hinder development of positive racial regard.
  4. Changing the World, One Website at a Time

    Mark Rank on a project to help everyday Americans see their risk of poverty.

  5. Community and the Crime Decline: The Causal Effect of Local Nonprofits on Violent Crime

    Largely overlooked in the theoretical and empirical literature on the crime decline is a long tradition of research in criminology and urban sociology that considers how violence is regulated through informal sources of social control arising from residents and organizations internal to communities. In this article, we incorporate the “systemic” model of community life into debates on the U.S. crime drop, and we focus on the role that local nonprofit organizations played in the national decline of violence from the 1990s to the 2010s.
  6. Climate Misinformation Campaigns and Public Sociology

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 1, Page 78-79, Winter 2016.
  7. The Racism-Race Reification Process: A Mesolevel Political Economic Framework for Understanding Racial Health Disparities

    The author makes the argument that many racial disparities in health are rooted in political economic processes that undergird racial residential segregation at the mesolevel—specifically, the neighborhood. The dual mortgage market is considered a key political economic context whereby racially marginalized people are isolated into degenerative ecological environments.

  8. Police Violence and Citizen Crime Reporting in the Black Community

    High-profile cases of police violence—disproportionately experienced by black men—may present a serious threat to public safety if they lower citizen crime reporting. Using an interrupted time series design, this study analyzes how one of Milwaukee’s most publicized cases of police violence against an unarmed black man, the beating of Frank Jude, affected police-related 911 calls.

  9. Naturalizing Gender through Childhood Socialization Messages in a Zoo

    We draw on public observations conducted in a zoo to identify three instances in which adults make use of its specific spatial and symbolic resources to transmit socialization messages to children according to "naturalized" models of hegemonic gender difference. First, adults attribute gender to zoo animals by projecting onto them human characteristics associated with feminine and masculine stereotypes. Second, adults mobilize zoo exhibits as props for modeling their own normative gender displays in the presence of children.

  10. Book Review: Race, Place, and Suburban Policing: Too Close for Comfort

    With questions of racial justice at the forefront of public discourse, especially in relation to police violence, this book presents a timely investigation.