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  1. Theory Making from the Middle: Researching LGBTQ Communities in Small Cities

    Urban lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) community research in sociology has largely ignored LGBTQ communities in the most common urban form: small cities. In this article, I argue that LGBTQ communities in small cities are an underexplored source of theory making about LGBTQ communities more broadly, and I highlight the ways such research enhances LGBTQ community research. I first discuss a definitional framework of LGBTQ communities in small cities. In other words, what do we mean by small cities, and what do we mean by LGBTQ communities within them?

  2. Small‐City Gay Bars, Big‐City Urbanism

    Despite the widely hailed importance of gay bars, what we know of them comes largely from the gayborhoods of four “great cities.” This paper explores the similarities of 55 lone small‐city gay bars to each other and the challenges they pose to the sexualities and urban literatures.

  3. Memories of Azoteas

    Roma catalyzed public discussions about deep-rooted racism against indigenous people, government repression of student movements, and above all, household workers’ lack of rights.
  4. The Ongoing Institution of Servitude

    Through a peek at one family’s life, Roma offers a glimpse at the burgeoning middle class, privileged not only by race and family inheritances but also by new possibilities of supposedly merit-based higher education.
  5. Of Love and Exploitation

    By speaking through Cleo, Cuarón offers the working elite a narrative to ease their own anxieties around class instability.
  6. Polluted Bodies

    Domestic employment requires unique physical proximity of bodies from different social classes, and often from different racial and ethnic backgrounds. Despite the physical closeness, different strategies are used to reproduce class hierarchies among people, resulting in embodied inequality.
  7. Does Socio-structural Context Matter? A Multilevel Test of Sexual Minority Stigma and Depressive Symptoms in Four Asia-Pacific Countries

    In the Asia-Pacific region, individual sexual stigma contributes to elevated rates of depression among sexual minority men. Less well understood is the role of socio-structural sexual stigma despite evidence that social context influences the experience of stigma. We use data from the United Nations Multi-country Study on Men and Violence to conduct a multilevel test of associations between individual- and cluster unit–level indicators of sexual stigma and depressive symptoms among sexual minority men (n = 562).
  8. Queer Pop‐Ups: A Cultural Innovation in Urban Life

    Research on sexuality and space emphasizes geographic and institutional forms that are stable, established, and fixed. By narrowing their analytic gaze on such places, which include gayborhoods and bars, scholars use observations about changing public opinions, residential integration, and the closure of nighttime venues to conclude that queer urban and institutional life is in decline. We use queer pop‐up events to challenge these dominant arguments about urban sexualities and to advocate instead a “temporary turn” that analyzes the relationship between ephemerality and placemaking.

  9. Queer Integrative Marginalization: LGBTQ Student Integration Strategies at an Elite University

    The author draws on the oral histories of 44 LGBTQ Princeton alumni who graduated from 1960 to 2011 to examine student strategies for negotiating marginal identities when integrating into an elite university. Even with greater LGBTQ visibility and resources at the institutional level, LGBTQ students’ experiences and strategies suggest that we question the larger social narrative of linear progress.

  10. Pedagogy: Teaching and Learning about Settler-colonial Racism: A Case for “Unsettling” Minoritizing and Multicultural Perspectives

    This article contributes to emerging efforts to decolonize race-based approaches and antiracist pedagogies in sociology. Building on recent scholarship on settler colonialism and decolonization as well as her experiences of being unsettled, the author discusses the limitations of her critical sociological toolkit for understanding and teaching about the cultural violence associated with “Indian” sport mascots.