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  1. JHSB Podcast on the U.S. Drug Overdose Epidemic

    In a new podcast, Ryan Thombs discusses research on "What is Driving the Drug Overdose Epidemic in the United States?" The article, written with coauthors Dennis L. Thombs, Andrew K. Jorgenson, Taylor Harris Braswell, appears in the September 2020 issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

    Listen here or on your preferred podcast platform.
     

    Read the article

  2. Top 10 Downloads from Each ASA Journal

    In 2019, readers downloaded sociological research that spanned a wide range of topics from “Sexual Harassment, Workplace Authority, and the Paradox of Power” (American Sociological Review) to “Rekeying Cultural Scripts for Youth Suicide” (Society and Mental Health) to “The Impact of Racial Diversity in the Classroom” (Teaching Sociology).

    Check out the 10 most downloaded articles from each of ASA's journals.

  3. COVID-19 Resources for Sociologists

    Every day we face new challenges related to COVID-19. ASA wants to help sociologists navigate those challenges. We are offering several resources to help sociologists in their work during this period.

    For more sociological perspectives and insights, see ASA's Special Issue of Footnotes on COVID-19.

  4. Ethics and Black Lives Matter Research

    As Black Lives Matter protests are ongoing in the United States and around the world, numerous sociologists are viewing these protests not only as opportunities to push for social change, but also as opportunities to better understand how social movements work. This is especially true for sociologists studying Collective Behavior and Social Movements. Given the emergent nature of these protests, some sociology faculty members working with students on collective action research may rely on students to collect data at these protests.

  5. Resources on Race, Police Violence, and Justice

    Protests against police violence and the systemic racism underlying it are underway across the country.  Sociologists have much to contribute to understanding and addressing these cultural and structural problems. ASA has developed a compilation of resources that can be used for research, teaching, and other outreach activities. Additional resources will be added to this page over time.

  6. Exclusionary School Discipline and Neighborhood Crime

    The author investigates the impact of law-and-order schools, defined as those that rely heavily on exclusionary discipline (i.e., suspension and expulsion) as a form of punishment, on neighborhood crime. Additional analyses are performed to assess whether the effects of punitive school discipline on local crime are moderated by neighborhood disadvantage. Findings suggest that suspensions are associated with increases in local crime—evidence of a macro-level school-to-prison pipeline—while expulsions are generally associated with fewer crime incidents.
  7. The 2020 ASA Annual Meeting in San Francisco Is Cancelled

    Update: While the 2020 ASA Annual Meeting in San Francisco has been cancelled, we welcome you to join an alternative virtual engagement event.

  8. Moving Past Imprisonment: The Challenges of Community Reintegration as Further Evidence of the Injustice of the Carceral State

    They are statistics familiar to many but that nevertheless warrant repeating: the United States incarcerates more people and at a higher rate than any other country in the world. And it’s not just a little bit more: U.S. rates of incarceration are five to ten times those of other advanced industrialized nations.
  9. A Call to Higher Education Administrators Regarding Student Educational Progress During COVID-19

    The COVID-19 global pandemic has created unprecedented challenges for higher education. Institutions are faced with difficult decisions about how best to continue serving their educational and research missions, while also protecting individual and public health. Institutions moved at exceptional speed to close their campuses and move all instruction online.

  10. Teaching about Animals: Incorporating Nonhuman Animals into Sociology Classrooms

    The topic of human–animal studies (HAS) remains largely ignored within the sociology classroom. While a few sociologists have encouraged teaching about animals, none has assessed whether incorporating nonhuman animals into the curriculum is effective. In this study, three instructors at two universities incorporated animal-related materials in their sociology courses in a variety of ways. Data analyzed from course exam responses and student papers as well as end-of-semester student surveys indicate that student learning and enjoyment were enhanced.