American Sociological Association

Search

The search found 612 results in 0.142 seconds.

Search results

  1. Social and Genetic Pathways in Multigenerational Transmission of Educational Attainment

    This study investigates the complex roles of the social environment and genes in the multigenerational transmission of educational attainment. Drawing on genome-wide data and educational attainment measures from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) and the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), I conduct polygenic score analyses to examine genetic confounding in the estimation of parents’ and grandparents’ influences on their children’s and grandchildren’s educational attainment.
  2. The Mark of a Woman’s Record: Gender and Academic Performance in Hiring

    Women earn better grades than men across levels of education—but to what end? This article assesses whether men and women receive equal returns to academic performance in hiring. I conducted an audit study by submitting 2,106 job applications that experimentally manipulated applicants’ GPA, gender, and college major. Although GPA matters little for men, women benefit from moderate achievement but not high achievement. As a result, high-achieving men are called back significantly more often than high-achieving women—at a rate of nearly 2-to-1.
  3. Born Poor? Racial Diversity, Inequality, and the American Pipeline

    The authors examine racial disparities in infants’ exposure to economic disadvantage at the family and local area levels. Using data from the 2008–2014 files of the American Community Survey, the authors provide an up-to-date empirical benchmark of newborns’ exposure to poverty. Large shares of Hispanic (36.5 percent) and black (43.2 percent) infants are born poor, though white infants are also overrepresented among the poor (17.7 percent).
  4. Separate and Unequal: The Impact of Socioeconomic Status, Segregation, and the Great Recession on Racial Disparities in Housing Values

    The effects of race, class, and residential segregation on housing values continue to be a major focus of sociological research. Nevertheless, there has yet to be a study that places these factors in the context of the great recession of 2008 and 2009. Accordingly, the purpose of this work is to assess the extent to which the great recession affected housing values for African Americans and whites relative to the joint effects of race, class, and residential segregation.
  5. School Strictness and Education: Investigating Racial and Ethnic Educational Inequalities Associated with Being Pushed Out

    There are racial and ethnic disparities associated with school discipline practices and pushout rates. In addition, research suggests that urban schools have stricter school discipline practices and higher pushout rates. What remains unknown, however, is the relationship between racial and ethnic inequality, school discipline practices, and pushout rates across urban, rural, and suburban schools.
  6. Completing the Educational Career: High School Graduation, Four-year College Enrollment, and Bachelor’s Degree Completion among Black, Hispanic, and White Students

    Using data from the Education Longitudinal Study, the author investigates racial disparities in high school graduation, four-year college enrollment, and bachelor’s degree completion. In addition, the author considers how conditionally relevant college and early adult variables shape bachelor’s degree completion. The results indicate that although comparable numbers of black and Hispanic students obtain bachelor’s degrees, their educational career trajectories differ substantially.
  7. Studentification and Disorder in a College Town

    This study uses interview and focus group data to examine how residents perceive and cope with studentification, disorder, and neighbor conflict in a college town. First, we find that nonstudent residents perceive studentification as the cause of neighborhood decline, but mainly blame larger forces and local actors, such as the university, city officials, and local developers, rather than the students.

  8. Maintaining Supremacy by Blocking Affirmative Action

    Today, affirmative action’s greatest power comes in its deployment as an extremely efficient rhetorical tool for mobilizing White resistance to racial equit, appropriating civil rights language to serve the goals of White supremacy.
  9. All Credentials aren’t Created Equal

    Louise Seamster on Tressie McMillan Cottom’s Lower Ed.
  10. Deception, Development, and Democracy

    Jacob Rugh on Christopher Mele’s Race and the Politics of Deception.