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  1. What Makes Popular Culture Popular? Product Features and Optimal Differentiation in Music

    What Makes Popular Culture Popular? Product Features and Optimal Differentiation in Music
  2. Cultural Meanings and the Aggregation of Actions: The Case of Sex and Schooling in Malawi

    Cultural Meanings and the Aggregation of Actions: The Case of Sex and Schooling in Malawi
  3. Making Sports More Sporting

    Sport may seem like a meritocracy, but scholars debunk, debate, and diagnose the boundaries that keep some on the sidelines, off the air, and out of the game all together.

  4. The Serious Business of Mommy Bloggers

    As their online efforts gather attention and become revenue sources, “mom bloggers” struggle to balance commercial affirmation with authenticity.

  5. Addicted to Hate: Identity Residual among Former White Supremacists

    The process of leaving deeply meaningful and embodied identities can be experienced as a struggle against addiction, with continuing cognitive, emotional, and physiological responses that are involuntary, unwanted, and triggered by environmental factors. Using data derived from a unique set of in-depth life history interviews with 89 former U.S. white supremacists, as well as theories derived from recent advances in cognitive sociology, we examine how a rejected identity can persist despite a desire to change.
  6. Cultural Guides, Cultural Critics: Distrust of Doctors and Social Support during Mental Health Treatment

    Research on relationships and health often interprets culture as the passively transmitted “content” of social ties, an approach that overlooks the influence of cultural resources on relationships themselves. I propose that mental health patients seek social support partly based on cultural resources held by their network members, including members’ medical knowledge and beliefs. I test hypotheses using data from the Indianapolis Network Mental Health Study, an egocentric network survey of new mental health patients (N = 152) and their personal relationships (N = 1,868).
  7. The New Bohemia as Urban Institution

    Bohemia, the colorful intersection of place, lifestyle, and artistic imagination, is rooted in the urban revolutions of 19th century Paris, and has proven to be a durable and transposable tradition of modernity in the nearly two centuries since. We have ideas about what living like an artist in the city should look like, and these in turn continue to powerfully shape what it does look like, culturally and materially. This cultural continuity today interacts with the structural transformation of the US economy and of American cities.

  8. Transporting Urban Inequality Through Public Transit Designs & Systems

    Four large, and often overflowing, dumpsters are situated at one of the more than dozen bus stops at the Chicago Transit Authority's (CTA) Red Line 95th Street/Dan Ryan train station. This station is on the city's far south side and the ridership on the buses that board and disembark there and the train is predominantly minority. On a warm or hot day, the smell of bus engines and dumpster contents fill the waiting areas.

  9. Urban Design in a New Age of Immigration

    Urban planners and designers have a significant role to play in addressing the needs of immigrants. The tools of urban planning—plans, designs, policies, regulations, financing strategies, and participatory methods that support them—have the potential to promote, sustain, or undermine the requirements of a diverse and multicultural city. Attempts to use urban planning and design to support immigrant neighborhoods are challenged by a lack of comprehensive federal immigration reform and the increasing significance of legal status in immigrant lives and communities.

  10. The Black Pacific: Anti-colonial Struggle and Oceanic Connections

    Sociology of Race and Ethnicity, Volume 3, Issue 4, Page 582-583, October 2017.