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  1. Where Punishment and Pregnancy Meet

    Megan Comfort speaks with Carolyn Sufrin, author of Jailcare: Finding the Safety Net for Women Behind Bars.

  2. Marketing Manhood in a “Post-Feminist” Age

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 2, Page 38-43, Spring 2017.
  3. Title IX at XLV

    Defending takes priority over celebrating Title IX as a landmark legislation in essays from Shehzad Nadeem, Cheryl Cooky, Ellen J. Staurowsky, Nicole M. LaVoi, and Erin Buzuvis.
  4. Gender Differences in Context: The Impact of Track Position on Study Involvement in Flemish Secondary Education

    This study examines whether the influence of track position on study involvement is gendered and whether gender differences in study involvement according to track position are associated with school misconduct and rather poor future perspectives. Three-level analyses (HLM 6) of data gathered in 2004-2005 from 11,872 third- and fifth-grade students in 146 tracks in a representative sample of 85 secondary schools in Flanders (Belgium) confirmed the impact of tracking on boys’ as well as girls’ study involvement.
  5. “Gender Utopias?”: U.S. Student Reflections on Studying Abroad in Norway and Sweden

    This article describes a study abroad experience in Norway and Sweden that was designed to explore gender equality in two of the world’s most gender-progressive countries. Course readings explored the work of feminist sociologists and asked students to think critically about gender equality from a cross-cultural perspective. Students met with leaders in Norway and Sweden who are involved in creating gender-progressive policy and culture, including members of parliament, representatives in the film industry, and social policy experts.
  6. Not Just Black and White: How Race/Ethnicity and Gender Intersect in Hookup Culture

    The increasing interest in research on hookups (i.e., noncommittal unions focused on sexual acts ranging from kissing to intercourse) often highlights individual-level predictors (e.g., alcohol use, attitudes) or gender/class differences. Racial/ethnic comparisons are often portrayed as White/non-White, despite literature on differing experiences within race by gender due to institutional-level differences, standards of beauty, and sexual stereotypes.
  7. When Does Differential Treatment Become Perceived Discrimination? An Intersectional Analysis in a Southern Brazilian Population

    Despite ideals of equality and “racial democracy,” high levels of social inequality persist in contemporary Brazil. In addition, while the majority of the Brazilian population acknowledges the persistence of racism, high proportions of socially disadvantaged groups do not regard themselves as victims of discrimination. This study seeks to shed light on this issue by investigating the processes through which individuals come to interpret their experiences of mistreatment as discrimination.
  8. A Tale of Two Cities: Variations in Perceptions of Disaster Recovery and the Importance of Intersectionality

    In this article, the author examines long-term recovery from disaster in Joplin, Missouri, and Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Tornados devastated both cities in 2011. The author asks (1) how sociohistoric contexts influenced perceptions of recovery and (2) how perceptions of recovery vary within and across social groups and geographic contexts. This research is based on fieldwork that spans 2013 to 2016, archival data, and 162 interviews. There are three main findings.
  9. God’s Case for Sex

    This article complicates a popular notion that conservative religions are incompatible with sexual expression and pleasure. Case studies from Orthodox Judaism and evangelical Protestant Christianity demonstrate a breadth of sexual expressions and negotiations of desire and sin that defy the association of conservative religions with sexual repression.

  10. Mapping Where the Girls Are

    Peggy Orenstein’s book, Girls & Sex, is reviewed, with attention to its framing of sexualization of girls and women and approaches to unraveling American “rape culture.”