American Sociological Association

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  1. Featured Essay: Sociology and Journalism: A Comparative Analysis

    Sociological researchers and journalists both study society and write or film reports about their findings, but they are not particularly fond of each other. Many sociologists disparage and even dismiss the work of journalists and, equally important, of fellow sociologists they consider to be journalists.
  2. ASA Signs on to Letter Supporting Federal Data Sources

    The ASA signed on to a letter expressing our strong support for the critical Federal data sources that inform and strengthen our nation’s world-leading economic, educational, democratic and civic institutions and successes. Our Federal statistical and data systems provide information that is uniquely accurate, objective, relevant, timely, and accessible. 

  3. What’s the Harm? The Coverage of Ethics and Harm Avoidance in Research Methods Textbooks

    Methods textbooks play a role in socializing a new generation of researchers about ethical research. How do undergraduate social research methods textbooks portray harm, its prevalence, and ways to mitigate harm to participants? We conducted a content analysis of ethics chapters in the 18 highest-selling undergraduate textbooks used in sociology research methods courses in the United States and Canada in 2013. We found that experiments are portrayed as the research design most likely to harm participants.
  4. Historical Sociology’s Puzzle of the Missing Transitions

    Prominent accounts of the transition to capitalism have a far too limited understanding of pre-capitalist agrarian economies’ potential for dynamism. Recent research shows that conditions earlier accounts identify as triggers for a transition to capitalism could be present without a transition occurring. I expand on implications of these cases of “missing transitions” for theorizing the dynamics of pre-capitalist agrarian economies.

  5. The Scholar Celebrated: The Work of W.E.B. Du Bois

    This special themed Book Review section is built around a review of Aldon Morris’s groundbreaking The Scholar Denied, a book that has argued for W.E.B. Du Bois’s inclusion as a founder of the discipline of sociology. Indeed, Crystal Fleming’s review kicks off this set of pieces.
  6. Theorizing at the Margins: Du Bois, The Scholar Denied, and the Matter of Black Lives

    Who could deny the enduring relevance of Du Bois’s nearly century-long record of achievement and the genius of this brilliant scholar’s mind? In fact, as Aldon Morris chronicles in The Scholar Denied, almost all of Du Bois’s white peers—and subsequent generations of white sociologists—worked very hard to ignore, undermine, and minimize the accomplishments of the multitalented and multilingual scholar, activist, and educator.
  7. Policy Entrepreneurs and the Origins of the Regulatory Welfare State: Child Labor Reform in Nineteenth-Century Europe

    Industrial child labor laws were the earliest manifestation of the modern regulatory welfare state. Why, despite the absence of political pressure from below, did some states (but not others) succeed in legislating working hours, minimum ages, and schooling requirements for working children in the first half of the nineteenth century? I use case studies of the politics behind the first child labor laws in Germany and France, alongside a case study of a failed child labor reform effort in Belgium, to answer this question.
  8. Hooking Up and Dating are Two Sides of a Coin

    Tracy Luff, Kristi Hoffman, and Marit Berntson on a false divide.

  9. Relationships: Cutting the Cord Is Easier Said Than Done

    Chances are, you have someone in your life who causes a lot of tension and stress. Difficult relationships are common. They are also commonly difficult to evade. Who are these people and why can't we just cut the cord?

    New research explores these questions and sheds light on the answers. Plain and simple: They are people you are stuck with, either because you need them or because you can't ignore them.