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  1. Accepting a Job Below One's Skill Level Can Adversely Affect Future Employment Prospects

    Accepting a job below one's skill level can be severely penalizing when applying for future employment because of the perception that someone who does this is less committed or less competent, according to new research from a sociologist at The University of Texas at Austin.

  2. Minorities' Homicide Victimization Rates Fall Significantly Compared to Whites'

    A new study reveals that while homicide victimization rates declined for whites, blacks, and Hispanics in the United States from 1990-2010, the drop was much more precipitous for the two minority groups.

  3. Polygamy and Alcohol Linked to Physical Abuse in African Marriages

    African women in polygamous marriages or with alcoholic husbands have a significantly higher risk of being physically abused by their husbands than women in monogamous marriages or women whose husbands don't abuse alcohol, new research shows.

  4. Pressure to 'Publish or Perish' May Discourage Innovative Research, Study Suggests

    The traditional pressure in academia for faculty to "publish or perish" advances knowledge in established areas. But it also might discourage scientists from asking the innovative questions that are most likely to lead to the biggest breakthroughs, according to a new study spearheaded by a UCLA professor.

  5. Lightness/Darkness of Skin Affects Male Immigrants' Likelihood of Gaining Employment

    Skin color is a significant factor in the probability of employment for male immigrants to the United States, according to a new study by two University of Kansas (KU) researchers.

  6. Young Whites Usually More Optimistic Than Minority Peers About Likelihood of Living to 35

    A new study of young people finds that, with one exception, whites are more optimistic — sometimes drastically so — than their minority peers about their likelihood of living to 35.

  7. Study Explores Why There Is No Labor Party in the United States

    The improbable rise of Bernie Sanders' presidential campaign presents an interesting question: why is Sanders, a self-proclaimed "democratic socialist," running as a Democrat? "In any other industrialized country, Sanders would likely be the standard-bearer for a labor or social democratic party," said McGill University sociologist Barry Eidlin, whose new study appears in the June issue of the American Sociological Review. "But the U.S. famously lacks such a party."

  8. Study Investigates Why Blacks Have Higher Risk of Cognitive Impairment

    Social and economic disadvantages play a significant role in why blacks face a much higher risk than whites of developing cognitive impairment later in life, indicates a national study led by a Michigan State University (MSU) sociologist.

  9. Study Reveals Incarceration’s Hidden Wounds for African American Men

    There’s a stark and troubling way that incarceration diminishes the ability of a former inmate to empathize with a loved one behind bars, but existing sociological theories fail to capture it, Vanderbilt University sociologists have found.

  10. Early Behavior Problems Impact Long-Term Educational Attainment More for Boys than Girls

    A new study finds that behavioral problems in early childhood have a larger negative effect on high school and college completion rates for boys than girls, which partially explains the substantial gender gap in educational attainment that currently exists in the United States.