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  1. Study Explores Reasons Behind Alcohol Abuse in Non-Heterosexual Women

    Non-heterosexual women who feel a disconnect between who they are attracted to and how they identify themselves may have a higher risk of alcohol abuse, according to a new study led by Amelia E. Talley, an assistant professor in Texas Tech University's Department of Psychological Sciences.

  2. ASA Files Amicus Brief With Supreme Court in Support of Marriage Equality

    The American Sociological Association (ASA) filed an amicus curiae brief yesterday with the Supreme Court of the United States in the same-sex marriage cases currently pending before the court. The ASA’s brief highlights the social science consensus that children raised by same-sex parents fare just as well as children raised by different-sex parents.

  3. Shift to Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual Identities in Early Adulthood Tied to Depressive Symptoms

    People whose sexual identities changed toward same-sex attraction in early adulthood reported more symptoms of depression in a nationwide survey than those whose sexual orientations did not change or changed in the opposite direction, according to a new study by a University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) sociologist.

  4. Study Suggests Same-Sex Couples Face More Obstacles to Infertility Treatment Than Opposite-Sex Couples

    Same-sex couples encounter more obstacles to treatment for infertility than opposite-sex couples, suggests a new study that will be presented at the 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA). 

  5. Sociologists Available to Discuss Same-Sex Marriage

    With the Supreme Court of the United States expected to rule imminently in the case of Obergefell v. Hodges, which addresses the matter of marriage equality and the constitutional status of state bans on same-sex marriage, the American Sociological Association (ASA) has a number of sociologists available to discuss same-sex marriage.

  6. Protests with Many Participants and Unified Message Most Likely to Influence Politicians, Study Suggests

    Protests that bring many people to the streets who agree among themselves and have a single message are most likely to influence elected officials, suggests a new study.

    “We found that features of a protest can alter the calculations of politicians and how they view an issue,” said Ruud Wouters, an assistant professor of political communication and journalism at the University of Amsterdam and the lead author of the study. “More specifically, the number of participants and unity are the characteristics of a protest that have the greatest ability to change politicians’ opinions.”

  7. Prepare for a Vote: Understanding the Proposed Revision to the ASA Code of Ethics

    At the 2014 Annual Meeting in San Francisco, Executive Officer Sally Hillsman, met with the Committee on Professional Ethics (COPE) and suggested that it was time to revise the Code of Ethics. Revisions were last made to the Code 20 years ago, and a great deal of change had taken place. Regulatory and technological advances have had striking impacts on the field. At the time, the Department of Health and Human Services was about to announce changes to The Common Rule, which governs the vast majority of human subjects research efforts.

  8. Contexts: Trump365

    Contexts
    Winter 2018, Vol. 17, No. 1

    Features include "After Charlottesville", "Ethnonationalism and the Rise of Donald Trump", "Trump’s Immigration Attacks, in Brief", "Making Protest Great Again", "Emasculation, Conservatism, and the 2016 Election", "Maintaining Supremacy by Blocking Affirmative Action", and "The Algorithmic Rise of the “Alt-Right."

  9. Theorizing Social Response to COVID-19 in the U.S. (Political Sociology)

    Nearly 90 percent of Americans are under stay-at-home and organizational closure orders from their state governors or city mayors (Washington Post, April 2, 2020). These orders may carry legal weight but have rarely been strictly enforced by police. Yet as of March 30, 53 percent of individuals were complying (CNN Ipsos poll, April 1). By April 7, 87% practiced social distancing (Yale Program on Climate Change Communication, April 17); 80% supported social distancing even if it damaged the economy (Politico poll, Star-Tribune, April 18). 

  10. Isolating Intervention: Prevention as Citizenship (Sociology of Sexualities)

    As the COVID-19 pandemic progresses, governments around the world search for virus prevention techniques to reduce the spread of the illness.