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  1. Understanding Race After Charlottesville

    Race and white supremacy - topics many sociologists devote a great deal of research to and know well - have, again, become front page topics after violence broke out in Charlottesville last month. On Monday, September 18, the American Sociological Association, American Historical Association, American Anthropological Association, and Society for Applied Anthropology

  2. The Spillover of Genomic Testing Results in Families: Same Variant, Different Logics

    Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Volume 58, Issue 2, Page 166-180, June 2017.
  3. Protest Campaigns and Movement Success: Desegregating the U.S. South in the Early 1960s

    Can protest bring about social change? Although scholarship on the consequences of social movements has grown dramatically, our understanding of protest influence is limited; several recent studies have failed to detect any positive effect. We investigate sit-in protest by black college students in the U.S. South in 1960, which targeted segregated lunch counters.

  4. Stay-at-Home Fatherhoods

    Nazneen Kane on the many motivations driving choices to father full-time.

    I was the only mom at the park, outnumbered not by nannies and babysitters but by stay-at-home fathers. Unlike my Washington, D.C. neighborhood, where privileged children were customarily tended by European au pairs and stay-at-home mothers, the children at this park in Cincinnati, Ohio were hanging out with their dads while mom acted as the primary breadwinner.

  5. Forming Families

    A review of Joshua Gamson’s Modern Families.

  6. Women’s-Group Fishponds in Bangladesh

    In this article, the authors assess the impact of a fish polyculture program introduced through women-only groups on the gender asset gap among households in the Jessore District of Bangladesh. The analysis is framed using gender structure theory to examine the ways individual, interactional, and macro forces shape the asset gap as a key gender equity outcome. The authors find that participation in the fishpond program, as a mechanism at the macro dimension of the gender structure, was associated with an increase in the gender asset gap over time.
  7. Paternal Incarceration and Teachers’ Expectations of Students

    In the past 40 years, paternal imprisonment has been transformed from an event affecting only the most unfortunate children to one that one in four African American children experience. Although research speculates that the stigma, strain, and separation resulting from paternal incarceration cause the poor outcomes of children of incarcerated fathers, evidence regarding these mechanisms is lacking.
  8. (Where) Is Functional Decline Isolating? Disordered Environments and the Onset of Disability

    The onset of disability is believed to undermine social connectedness and raise the risk of social isolation, yet spatial environments are seldom considered in this process. This study examines whether unruly home and neighborhood conditions intensify the association between disability onset and several dimensions of social connectedness. I incorporate longitudinal data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project, which contains environmental evaluations conducted by trained observers (N = 1,558).
  9. Public Assistance, Relationship Context, and Jail for Child Support Debt

    Previous studies of poverty governance have focused on the welfare system, the criminal justice system, and the connections between them. Yet less attention has been paid to a third institution that bridges the gap between these two systems: child support enforcement. Jailing for child support nonpayment is one of many mechanisms of child support enforcement, but little is known about this tactic.
  10. Men as Dependents? Marriage and Changes in Health Insurance Coverage among Working-age Adults in the United States, 1988 to 2008

    Changes in marriage and employment patterns may have affected health insurance coverage rates differently for women and men. The author investigates changes in health insurance coverage between 1988 and 2008, focusing on employersponsored insurance (ESI) dependent and employee coverage. Using Oaxaca-Blinder decompositions and Current Population Survey data, the author finds that married men’s coverage as dependents increased from 1988 to 2008, but a smaller share of men were married in 2008. Coupled with declines in ESI employee coverage, changes in marriage increased men’s uninsurance rate.