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  1. Strategies Men Use to Negotiate Family and Science

    Elaine Howard Ecklund, Sarah Damaske, Anne E. Lincoln, Virginia Johnston White
  2. 2017 Guide to Graduate Departments of Sociology Now Available

    The American Sociological Association is pleased to present the 2017 edition of the ASA Guide to Graduate Departments of Sociology. First published in 1965, the Guide can be used by a wide range of constituents for a variety of purposes—from graduate students considering job prospects to faculty advising undergraduates about graduate programs.

  3. ASA Task Force on Contingent Faculty Interim Report

    The ASA Task Force on Contingent Faculty was appointed to address the changes in faculty employment and working conditions, career prospects for graduate students, and the consequences for higher education that have resulted from the increased reliance on contingent faculty. Contingent faculty, both part-time and full-time non-tenure track, have increased dramatically. By 2011 a majority of faculty were employed part-time.  Contingent faculty are least common at Ph.D.

  4. "It's on the MCAT for a Reason:" Premedical Students and the Perceived Utility of Sociology

    Biomedical socialization and premed culture have been shown to promote reductionist and depersonalized approaches to understanding human difference, a serious problem in contemporary health care. In 2015, the Association for American Medical Colleges (AAMC) launched a new version of its Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) that included material from sociology, providing sociology departments an unprecedented opportunity to instruct premed students on contextualizing human difference and being sensitive to the diverse trajectories of people in the health care system.

  5. The Spillover of Genomic Testing Results in Families: Same Variant, Different Logics

    Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Volume 58, Issue 2, Page 166-180, June 2017.
  6. Stay-at-Home Fatherhoods

    Nazneen Kane on the many motivations driving choices to father full-time.

    I was the only mom at the park, outnumbered not by nannies and babysitters but by stay-at-home fathers. Unlike my Washington, D.C. neighborhood, where privileged children were customarily tended by European au pairs and stay-at-home mothers, the children at this park in Cincinnati, Ohio were hanging out with their dads while mom acted as the primary breadwinner.

  7. Forming Families

    A review of Joshua Gamson’s Modern Families.

  8. Women’s-Group Fishponds in Bangladesh

    In this article, the authors assess the impact of a fish polyculture program introduced through women-only groups on the gender asset gap among households in the Jessore District of Bangladesh. The analysis is framed using gender structure theory to examine the ways individual, interactional, and macro forces shape the asset gap as a key gender equity outcome. The authors find that participation in the fishpond program, as a mechanism at the macro dimension of the gender structure, was associated with an increase in the gender asset gap over time.
  9. Paternal Incarceration and Teachers’ Expectations of Students

    In the past 40 years, paternal imprisonment has been transformed from an event affecting only the most unfortunate children to one that one in four African American children experience. Although research speculates that the stigma, strain, and separation resulting from paternal incarceration cause the poor outcomes of children of incarcerated fathers, evidence regarding these mechanisms is lacking.
  10. Testing a Digital Inequality Model for Online Political Participation

    Increasing Internet use is changing the way individuals take part in society. However, a general mobilizing effect of the Internet on political participation has been difficult to demonstrate. This study takes a digital inequality perspective and analyzes the role of Internet expertise for the social structuration of online political participation. Analyses rely on two nationally representative surveys in Switzerland and use cluster analysis and structural equation modeling. A distinct group of political online participants emerged characterized by high education and income.