American Sociological Association

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  1. Measuring College Learning in Sociology: SSRC and ASA Collaboration Reaches Milestone

    Book CoverIn 2013 the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) initiated the Measuring College Learning (MCL) project because SSRC recognized a pressing need for greater clarity, intentionality, and quality in U.S. higher education.

  2. ASA Applauds Supreme Court’s Ruling to Uphold Affirmative Action Program at University of Texas

    The American Sociological Association (ASA) applauds the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling today in the affirmative action case Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin. The judgement allows the university to continue using race as a factor in admissions decisions.

  3. Relationships With Family Members, But Not Friends, Decrease Likelihood of Death

    For older adults, having more or closer family members in one’s social network decreases his or her likelihood of death, but having a larger or closer group of friends does not, finds a new study that was presented at the 111th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

  4. Reconsidering Student Evaluations of Teaching

    Washington, DC:  A formal statement issued by the American Sociological Association (www.asanet.org/studentevaluations), and endorsed by 17 other scholarly associations, describes the current use of student evaluations of teaching as “problematic” and identifies ways to use student feedback appropriately as one part of holistic assessment of teaching effectiveness in institutions of higher education.

  5. Contagious Addiction: Opioid Prescriptions Increase Likelihood of Family Members’ Use

    Contact: Naomi Paiss, Communications Director, at (202) 247-9859, npaiss@asanet.org, or (202) 440-0875 (cell); Johanna Olexy, Senior Communications Associate, at (202) 247-9873, communications@asanet.org, or (202) 251-6251 (cell).

    Washington, DC.  While opioid addiction and abuse continues to figure as the most serious public health emergency in the U.S., academic research is increasingly able to identify some of its causes.