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  1. Study Uses 311 Complaints to Track Where and When Neighborhood Conflict Emerges

    Each year, 311 — New York City's main hub for government information and non-emergency services — receives millions of requests and complaints, including New Yorkers' gripes about their neighbors.

  2. Actresses Must Be Picky About With Whom They Work to Survive in Movie Industry

    Actresses need to be pickier than men about with whom they work if they want to survive in the movie industry, suggests a new study.

    "My research indicates that women in the film industry suffer a lack of access to future career opportunities when they tend to work with people who have collaborated frequently in the past," said Mark Lutter, lead author of the study and head of the "Transnational Diffusion of Innovation" Research Group at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies (MPIfG) in Germany.

  3. Childhood Poverty, Parental Abuse Cost Adults Their Health for Years to Come

    Growing up in poverty or being abused by parents can lead to accumulated health problems later in life, according to research from Purdue University.

    "Childhood disadvantage has long-term health consequences—much longer than most of us realize," said Kenneth F. Ferraro, distinguished professor of sociology. "A novel aspect of this study is that childhood disadvantage was linked to the onset of new health problems decades later."

  4. Study Suggests Earning a College Degree Before, But Not After, Getting Married Protects Against Obesity

    People who earn a college degree before getting married are much less likely to become obese than those who graduate from college after getting married, according to a new study.

  5. Consumers Increasingly Face Companies’ Creative Smoke and Mirrors, Study Finds

    Heavily marketed as a safer, healthful alternative to smoking, electronic cigarettes are under fire from California health officials who have declared "vaping" a public health threat, hoping to head off the type of deceptive manipulation that tobacco companies succeeded with for decades, according to researchers. 

  6. Shift to Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual Identities in Early Adulthood Tied to Depressive Symptoms

    People whose sexual identities changed toward same-sex attraction in early adulthood reported more symptoms of depression in a nationwide survey than those whose sexual orientations did not change or changed in the opposite direction, according to a new study by a University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) sociologist.

  7. Study Suggests Same-Sex Couples Face More Obstacles to Infertility Treatment Than Opposite-Sex Couples

    Same-sex couples encounter more obstacles to treatment for infertility than opposite-sex couples, suggests a new study that will be presented at the 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA). 

  8. Study Shows TV's Subliminal Influence on Women's Perception of Pregnancy and Birth

    In an era where popular culture is increasingly recognized for its impact on lay understanding of health and medicine, few scholars have looked at television's powerful role in the creation of patient expectations, especially regarding pregnancy and birth.  

  9. Journal of Health and Social Behavior: Forty Years of Medical Sociology

    Journal of Health and Social Behavior: Forty Years of Medical Sociology
  10. Contexts: Personal, Political

    Winter 2017 Vol. 16 No. 1

    Features include "Chump Change", "Living on the Fringe in Post-apartheid Cape Town", "Love Wins", "Could There Be a Silver Lining to Zika?", and "'Straight Girls Kissing' Beyond the Elite College Campus."