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  1. Sociologists to Explore the Topics of Culture, Inequalities, and Social Inclusion at Annual Meeting in Montreal, Aug. 12–15

    More than 5,500 sociologists will convene in Montreal this August to explore scientific research relating to social inequality and many other topics, as part of the American Sociological Association’s 112th Annual Meeting. This year’s theme, “Culture, Inequalities, and Social Inclusion across the Globe,” draws attention to the nexus of culture, inequalities, and group boundaries in order to promote greater social inclusion and resilience, collective well-being, and solidarity in Canada, the United States, and globally.

  2. The [Un]Surprising Alt-Right

    by Robert Futrell and Pete Simi

    The night that Barack Obama was elected President in 2008, the White supremacist web forum Stormfront lit up with posts about racial extremists’ fantastical visions of violence to combat “White racial genocide.” On election night 2016, Stormfront lit up again as White supremacists expressed triumph with Donald Trump’s victory. They celebrated: “We finally have one of us in the White House again!”

  3. Chains of Power and Their Representation

    Power is the ability to send and bind someone else to act on one’s behalf, a relation that depends upon habits of interpretation. For persons attempting to complete projects, power involves communicating with, recruiting, and controlling subordinates and confronting those who are not in such a relationship of recruitment. This leads to a basic theoretical vocabulary about power players and their projects—a model of rector, actor, and other. As multiple relations of sending and binding become mutually implicated, chains of power—understood as simultaneously social and symbolic—emerge.
  4. After Charlottesville: A Contexts Symposium

    In a joint editorial effort, the editors of Contexts have assembled a group of writers who specialize in research on race, racism, whiteness, nationalism, and immigration to provide sociological insights about how the public, politicians, and academics should process and understand the broader sociohistorical implications of the events in Charlottesville.

  5. Understanding Race After Charlottesville

    Race and white supremacy - topics many sociologists devote a great deal of research to and know well - have, again, become front page topics after violence broke out in Charlottesville last month. On Monday, September 18, the American Sociological Association, American Historical Association, American Anthropological Association, and Society for Applied Anthropology

  6. A 200-Year Weight Debate

    Amanda M. Czerniawski charts two centuries of height and weight’s actuarial ideals.

  7. Marketing Manhood in a “Post-Feminist” Age

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 2, Page 38-43, Spring 2017.
  8. Title IX at XLV

    Defending takes priority over celebrating Title IX as a landmark legislation in essays from Shehzad Nadeem, Cheryl Cooky, Ellen J. Staurowsky, Nicole M. LaVoi, and Erin Buzuvis.
  9. Fields of Mutual Alignment: A Dual-Order Approach to the Study of Cultural Holes

    In this article, I discuss how network-analytic exploitations of the duality of agents and social object enable the study of fields from two analytical vantage points. Such an approach entails: (1) the discovery of field positions through identification of cultural holes within a network of agents’ tastes and (2) the measurement of interobject competition to identify social objects contributing most to the organization of field positions. Characterizing this approach as a mutual-alignment framework, I discuss its analytical advantages.