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  1. Neighborhood Effects on Immigrants’ Experiences of Work-Family Conflict and Psychological Distress

    The neighborhood context is considered a key institution of inequality influencing individuals’ exposure and psychological vulnerability to stressors in the work-family interface, including work-family conflict (WFC). However, experiences of neighborhood context, WFC, and its mental health consequences among minority populations—including foreign-born residents—remain unexplored. We address this limitation and draw on tenants of the stress process model to unpack our hypotheses. We further test whether our focal associations vary for mothers and fathers.
  2. Sociological Insights for Development Policy

    The Sociology of Development Section announces a new policy brief series: Sociological Insights for Development Policy. The purpose of the series is not only to raise awareness of the thought-provoking research being done by members of the section, but also to strengthen engagement between scholars, policy makers and development practitioners. The long-term aim is to enhance sociology’s impact on development discourse and practice throughout the world. Sociological Insights for Development Policy publish short (2-page) briefs that are distilled from section members’ research.

  3. Contexts: Reckoning

    Contexts
    Summer 2017 Vol. 16 No. 3

    Features include "Black Lives and police Tactics Matter", "Who Would Eat Such a Fish", "The Hidden Privilege in "Potty Politics", and "Glory and Gore."

  4. Race, Space, and Surveillance: Understanding the Relationship between Criminal Justice Contact and Institutional Involvement

    Ethnographies of young men of color offer competing theories regarding how individuals react to criminal justice contact. System avoidance theory suggests that black and Latino men in segregated neighborhoods avoid formal institutions because of fear of surveillance, while Rios contends that they frame their criminal justice contact as a racial injustice and become activists. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent to Adult Health, this study tests these hypotheses.
  5. Facing the Great Recession in Deprived Urban Areas: How Civic Capacity Contributes to Neighborhood Resilience

    Research suggests that some communities are more resilient than others in the face of the same external stress. Both the local effects of and local responses to the 2008 financial collapse and economic recession have been geographically variegated. Drawing upon two case studies in the Metropolitan Region of Barcelona (Spain), this paper aims to understand why some historically deprived neighborhoods are proving more resilient than others in facing the effects of the Great Recession.

  6. Film Review: We Are Not Ghosts!

    Film Review: We Are Not Ghosts!
  7. Born Poor? Racial Diversity, Inequality, and the American Pipeline

    The authors examine racial disparities in infants’ exposure to economic disadvantage at the family and local area levels. Using data from the 2008–2014 files of the American Community Survey, the authors provide an up-to-date empirical benchmark of newborns’ exposure to poverty. Large shares of Hispanic (36.5 percent) and black (43.2 percent) infants are born poor, though white infants are also overrepresented among the poor (17.7 percent).
  8. From Green Gentrification to Resilience Gentrification: An Example from Brooklyn

    From Green Gentrification to Resilience Gentrification: An Example from Brooklyn

  9. The Disorder Perceptions of Nonresidents: A Textual Analysis of Open‐Ended Survey Responses to Photographic Stimuli

    Nonresidents’ perceptions of disorder are potentially consequential for neighborhoods in many ways, as disorder shapes individuals’ behavior within neighborhoods. Unfortunately, there is little research which delves into understanding how nonresidents perceive disorder. Our study provides insight into the perceptions of nonresidents by assessing their interpretations of disorder through their reaction to three photographic stimuli of neighborhoods where they do not live.

  10. Facing the Great Recession in Deprived Urban Areas: How Civic Capacity Contributes to Neighborhood Resilience

    Research suggests that some communities are more resilient than others in the face of the same external stress. Both the local effects of and local responses to the 2008 financial collapse and economic recession have been geographically variegated. Drawing upon two case studies in the Metropolitan Region of Barcelona (Spain), this paper aims to understand why some historically deprived neighborhoods are proving more resilient than others in facing the effects of the Great Recession.