American Sociological Association

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  1. Contexts: Loving and Leaving

    Contexts
    Fall 2017 Vol. 16 No. 4

    Feature articles include "Virginia is for Lovers", "Marijuana’s Moral Entrepreneurs, Then and Now", "Commuter Spouses and the Changing American Family", "The Queer Work of Militarized Prides", "Accountability after Genocide", and "Race, Class, and the Framing of Drug Epidemics."

  2. Men as Dependents? Marriage and Changes in Health Insurance Coverage among Working-age Adults in the United States, 1988 to 2008

    Changes in marriage and employment patterns may have affected health insurance coverage rates differently for women and men. The author investigates changes in health insurance coverage between 1988 and 2008, focusing on employersponsored insurance (ESI) dependent and employee coverage. Using Oaxaca-Blinder decompositions and Current Population Survey data, the author finds that married men’s coverage as dependents increased from 1988 to 2008, but a smaller share of men were married in 2008. Coupled with declines in ESI employee coverage, changes in marriage increased men’s uninsurance rate.
  3. Going Out: A Sociology of Public Outings

    In this article we propose a framework for description and analysis of public life by treating “outings” as a unit of sociological analysis. Studying outings requires bracketing a concern with bounded places and isolated encounters. Instead, descriptions of outings track people as they organize trips “out,” including their preparations, turning points, and post hoc reflections. We emphasize how people understand and contextualize their time in public by linking situated moments of public life to the outing’s unfolding trajectory and to people’s biographical circumstances.
  4. The Algorithmic Rise of the “Alt-Right”

    As with so many technologies, the Internet’s racism was programmed right in—and it’s quickly fueled the spread of White supremacist, xenophobic rhetoric throughout the western world.
  5. Review Essays: Whither LGBT Rights in the Post-Marriage Era?

    In light of the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2015 ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges, extending government recognition of same-sex marriages nationwide, a casual observer might have been tempted to conclude that the work of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) rights movement was all but finished. Marriage equality had long appeared to be the central goal of this increasingly powerful movement, and the Supreme Court victory capped a dramatic shift in public opinion toward support for marriage equality, a shift that occurred relatively quickly and for a complex mix of reasons.
  6. Race Differences in Linking Family Formation Transitions to Women’s Mortality

    We examine how the timing and sequencing of first marriage and childbirth are related to mortality for a cohort of 4,988 white and black women born between 1922 and 1937 from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women. We use Cox proportional hazard models to estimate race differences in the association between family formation transitions and mortality. Although we find no relationships between marital histories and longevity, we do find that having children, the timing of first birth, and the sequencing of childbirth and marriage are associated with mortality.
  7. Dual Autonomies, Divergent Approaches: How Stratification in Medical Education Shapes Approaches to Patient Care

    The United States relies on international and osteopathic medical graduates (“non-USMDs”) to fill one third of residency positions because of a shortage of American MD graduates (“USMDs”). Non-USMDs are often informally excluded from top residency positions, while USMDs tend to fill the most prestigious residencies. Little is known, however, about whether the training in these different settings is comparable or how it impacts patients.
  8. Is There a Male Marital Wage Premium? New Evidence from the United States

    This study reconsiders the phenomenon that married men earn more money than unmarried men, a key result of the research on marriage benefits. Many earlier studies have found such a “male marital wage premium.” Recent studies using panel data for the United States conclude that part of this premium is due to selection of high earners into marriage. Nevertheless, a substantial effect of marriage seems to remain. The current study investigates whether the remaining premium is really a causal effect.
  9. Watching the Ethnographers

    Interrogating Ethnography: Why Evidence Matters by Steven Lubet Oxford University Press, 2017 216 pages

  10. Marriage, Social Control, and Health Behavior: A Dyadic Analysis of Same-sex and Different-sex Couples

    Prior research based on studies of heterosexual populations suggests that men’s health benefits more from marriage than women’s, in part because women do more than men to influence the health habits of their spouse. We extend this work by using dyadic survey data from 838 spouses in 419 gay, lesbian, and heterosexual marriages to consider differences in social control tactics across same-sex and different-sex couples—that is, how spouses monitor and regulate each other’s health habits.