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  1. Disability and Qualitative Inquiry: Methods for Rethinking an Ableist World

    Contemporary Sociology, Volume 46, Issue 1, Page 36-37, January 2017.
  2. Habit and the Body: Lessons for Social Theories of Habit from the Experiences of People with Physical Disabilities

    Habitual action has been an important concept in sociological theory insofar as it allows for a conceptualization of action that does not rely on paradigmatic loyalty to a rational decision-making subject. One insight from theories of habit that is of particular importance for understanding how habit structures experience is the idea that habits are always habits in a world: we act in a material environment that is itself constitutive of action.

  3. Review Essays: On the Line: Latino Life in New Immigrant Destinations after 2005

    Two years—2005 and 2006—were critical for Latino immigrants living in “new destinations” across the U.S. South. A substantial body of literature documents whites and blacks reacting to Latino newcomers warmly or paternalistically (at best) to neutrally or ambivalently or occasionally negatively (at worst) in the two decades prior.
  4. Time Reference in the Service of Social Action

    Social Psychology Quarterly, Volume 80, Issue 2, Page 109-131, June 2017.
  5. Factors Influencing Achievement in Undergraduate Social Science Research Methods Courses

    Undergraduate social science research methods courses tend to have higher than average rates of failure and withdrawal. Lack of success in these courses impedes students’ progression through their degree programs and negatively impacts institutional retention and graduation rates. Grounded in adult learning theory, this mixed methods study examines the factors that influence student achievement in these courses among a sample of 724 social science students.
  6. Integrating Program Assessment and a Career Focus into a Research Methods Course

    Sociology research methods students in 2013 and 2016 implemented a series of “real world” data gathering activities that enhanced their learning while assisting the department with ongoing program assessment and program review.
  7. The Form and Flow of Teaching Ethnographic Knowledge: Hands-on Approaches for Learning Epistemology

    A glance across ethnographic methods terrain reveals multiple controversies and divisive critiques. When training graduate students, these debates and controversies can be consequential. We offer suggestions for teaching graduate ethnographic methods courses that, first, help students understand some of the common epistemological debates in the field and, second, provide them with hands-on activities to practice working within different knowledge traditions.
  8. Groups That Work: Student Achievement in Group Research Projects and Effects on Individual Learning

    Group research projects frequently are used to teach undergraduate research methods. This study uses multivariate analyses to examine the characteristics of higher-achieving groups (those that earn higher grades on group research projects) and to estimate the effects of participating in higher-achieving groups on subsequent individual learning (grade on final paper). The sample includes 257 students who completed a sociology research methods course at a small liberal arts institution between 2004 and 2015.
  9. Where “Old Heads” Prevail: Inmate Hierarchy in a Men’s Prison Unit

    Research on inmate social order, a once-vibrant area, receded just as U.S. incarceration rates climbed and the country’s carceral contexts dramatically changed. This study returns to inmate society with an abductive mixed-methods investigation of informal status within a contemporary men’s prison unit. We collected narrative and social network data from 133 male inmates housed in a unit of a Pennsylvania medium-security prison.
  10. The Costs of Simplicity: Why Multilevel Models May Benefit from Accounting for Cross-Cluster Differences in the Effects of Controls

    Context effects, where a characteristic of an upper-level unit or cluster (e.g., a country) affects outcomes and relationships at a lower level (e.g., that of the individual), are a primary object of sociological inquiry. In recent years, sociologists have increasingly analyzed such effects using quantitative multilevel modeling. Our review of multilevel studies in leading sociology journals shows that most assume the effects of lower-level control variables to be invariant across clusters, an assumption that is often implausible.