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  1. Study Shows How a Community’s Culture and Social Connectedness Can Increase Suicide Risk

    Community characteristics play an important role in perpetuating teen suicide clusters and thwarting prevention efforts, according to a new study by sociologists at the University of Chicago (UChicago) and University of Memphis who examined clusters in a single town.

  2. Riding the Stagecoach to Hell: A Qualitative Analysis of Racial Discrimination in Mortgage Lending

    Recent studies have used statistical methods to show that minorities were more likely than equally qualified whites to receive high-cost, high-risk loans during the U.S. housing boom, evidence taken to suggest widespread discrimination in the mortgage lending industry. The evidence, however, was indirect, being inferred from racial differentials that persisted after controlling for other factors known to affect the terms of lending. Here we assemble a qualitative database to generate direct evidence of discrimination.

  3. Latina/o or Mexicana/o? The Relationship between Socially Assigned Race and Experiences with Discrimination

    Discrimination based on one’s racial or ethnic background is one of the oldest and most perverse practices in the United States. Although much research has relied on self-reported racial categories, a growing body of research is designed to measure race through socially assigned race. Socially assigned or ascribed race measures how individuals feel they are classified by other people.

  4. "Oil and Water"? Latino-white Relations and Symbolic Integration in a Changing California

    Existing research on race relations between racial/ethnic groups in the United States highlights how personal contact can lead to increased harmony or conflict between groups and may reduce intergroup prejudice. This study engages this literature and draws from more than 20 months of ethnography and 66 interviews in a Spanish/English dual-language school in Los Angeles to qualitatively examine Latino-white relations in diverse settings.

  5. Does the Race of the Discrimination Agent in Latinos Discrimination Experiences Influence Latino Group Identity?

    Discrimination experiences are among the dominant conditions that define racial and ethnic populations in the United States. Although scholars in the social sciences have investigated the relationship between racial discrimination and various outcomes, less is known about how the sources of discrimination may vary within populations. Most studies and theories driving those studies assume that racial and ethnic minorities are being discriminated against by members of the dominant group.

  6. Part-Latinos and Racial Reporting in the Census: An Issue of Question Format?

    In this study, the author examines the racial reporting decisions of the offspring of Latino/non-Latino white, black, and Asian intermarriages, focusing on the meanings associated with their racial responses in the 2010 census and their thoughts on the separate race and Hispanic origin question format. Through interviews with 50 part-Latinos from New York, the findings demonstrated that their racial responses were shaped largely by question design, often due to the lack of Hispanic origins in the race question.

  7. Home, Heart, and Being Latina: Housing and Intimate Relationship Power among Low-income Mexican Mothers

    The authors examine an emergent association between low-income Mexican mothers’ control of housing and power relations in their romantic unions.

  8. Tradition and Innovation in Scientists’ Research Strategies

    What factors affect a scientist’s choice of research problem? Qualitative research in the history and sociology of science suggests that this choice is patterned by an “essential tension” between productive tradition and risky innovation. We examine this tension through Bourdieu’s field theory of science, and we explore it empirically by analyzing millions of biomedical abstracts from MEDLINE. We represent the evolving state of chemical knowledge with networks extracted from these abstracts. We then develop a typology of research strategies on these networks.

  9. Lies, Damned Lies, and Survey Self-Reports? Identity as a Cause of Measurement Bias

    Explanations of error in survey self-reports have focused on social desirability: that respondents answer questions about normative behavior to appear prosocial to interviewers. However, this paradigm fails to explain why bias occurs even in self-administered modes like mail and web surveys. We offer an alternative explanation rooted in identity theory that focuses on measurement directiveness as a cause of bias.

  10. Book Review: Race, Place, and Suburban Policing: Too Close for Comfort

    With questions of racial justice at the forefront of public discourse, especially in relation to police violence, this book presents a timely investigation.