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  1. Durkheim’s “Suicide” in the Zombie Apocalypse

    Hypothesizing the end of functional society by reading Durkheim and watching “The Walking Dead,” three scholars consider how low social integration and low moral regulation shape suicide risk at the group level.
  2. Directional Asymmetry in Sociological Analyses

    Socius, Volume 3, Issue , January 2017.
  3. Maximum Likelihood for Cross-lagged Panel Models with Fixed Effects

    Panel data make it possible both to control for unobserved confounders and allow for lagged, reciprocal causation. Trying to do both at the same time, however, leads to serious estimation difficulties. In the econometric literature, these problems have been solved by using lagged instrumental variables together with the generalized method of moments (GMM). Here we show that the same problems can be solved by maximum likelihood (ML) estimation implemented with standard software packages for structural equation modeling (SEM).
  4. Racial/Ethnic Perceptions from Hispanic Names: Selecting Names to Test for Discrimination

    Researchers increasingly use correspondence audit studies to study racial/ethnic discrimination in employment, housing, and other domains. Although this method provides strong causal evidence of racial/ethnic discrimination, these claims depend on the signal being clearly conveyed through names. Few studies have pretested individual racial and ethnic perceptions of the names used to examine discrimination. The author conducts a survey experiment in which respondents are asked to identify the races or ethnicities they associate with a series of names.
  5. Empowerment Gone Bad: Communicative Consequences of Power Transfers

    Empowerment as a positively connoted concept has been studied extensively in applied research in different fields. Yet its unfavorable, paradoxical character has so far not received enough theoretical attention to make it possible to improve empowerment efforts.
  6. Religion among Scientists in International Context: A New Study of Scientists in Eight Regions

    Scientists have long been associated with religion’s decline around the world. But little data permit analysis of the religiosity of scientists or their perceptions of the science-faith interface.
  7. ASA President Writes Letter in Defense of Jan Tomasz Gross

    ASA President Michèle Lamont recently wrote President Andrzej Duda, Chancellery of the President of the Republic of Poland criticizing a new Polish law that significantly harms academic freedom. The law punishes those who study Poland's past and reach a well researched conclusion that is opposite to the Polish government's narrative. 

    Lamont urges that no charges be filed against Professor Gross. Gross has written about Poles complicity in the persecution of Jews during WWII.

  8. Neighborhood Effects on Immigrants’ Experiences of Work-Family Conflict and Psychological Distress

    The neighborhood context is considered a key institution of inequality influencing individuals’ exposure and psychological vulnerability to stressors in the work-family interface, including work-family conflict (WFC). However, experiences of neighborhood context, WFC, and its mental health consequences among minority populations—including foreign-born residents—remain unexplored. We address this limitation and draw on tenants of the stress process model to unpack our hypotheses. We further test whether our focal associations vary for mothers and fathers.
  9. Race, Emotional Reliance, and Mental Health

    Prior research shows that emotional reliance, an indicator of interpersonal dependence, is an important psychosocial risk factor for mental health problems. However, few have considered black-white differences in emotional reliance or the role it may play in racial variations in mental health outcomes. Using a community epidemiologic sample of adults in Nashville, Tennessee, the current study builds on the small literature on emotional reliance by exploring three aims. First, we evaluate racial differences in emotional reliance.
  10. ASA President Eduardo Bonilla-Silva Responds to Chief Justice John Roberts

    Last week, Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts, during oral arguments in the gerrymandering case Gill v Whitford, referred to social science as "sociological gobbledygook." ASA President Eduardo Bonilla-Silva has responded in a letter, the content of which is below. You can also download a .pdf of the letter here


    Dear Chief Justice John Roberts: