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  1. Racial Differences in Depression Trajectories among Older Women: Socioeconomic, Family, and Health Influences

    Despite recent increases in life course research on mental illness, important questions remain about the social patterning of, and explanations for, depression trajectories among women in later life. The authors investigate competing theoretical frameworks for the age patterning of depressive symptoms and the physical health, socioeconomic, and family mechanisms differentiating black and white women.

  2. Suicidal Disclosures among Friends: Using Social Network Data to Understand Suicide Contagion

    A robust literature suggests that suicide is socially contagious; however, we know little about how and why suicide spreads. Using network data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, we examine the effects of alter’s (1) disclosed and (2) undisclosed suicide attempts, (3) suicide ideation, and (4) emotional distress on ego’s mental health one year later to gain insights into the emotional and cultural mechanisms that underlie suicide contagion.

  3. A Twin Study on Perceived Stress, Depressive Symptoms, and Marriage

    Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Volume 58, Issue 1, Page 37-53, March 2017.
  4. Children’s Education and Parents’ Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms

    Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Volume 58, Issue 1, Page 86-101, March 2017.
  5. Binge Drinking and Depression: The Influence of Romantic Partners in Young Adulthood

    Although research shows that spouses influence each other’s health behaviors and psychological well being, we know little about whether these patterns extend to young people in nonmarital as well as marital relationships. We use the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health to consider how a romantic partner’s binge drinking and depression influence the respondent’s binge drinking and depression within 1,111 young adult couples and explore whether these processes are moderated by gender.
  6. A Member Saved Is a Member Earned? The Recruitment-Retention Trade-Off and Organizational Strategies for Membership Growth

    A Member Saved Is a Member Earned? The Recruitment-Retention Trade-Off and Organizational Strategies for Membership Growth
  7. Is There a “Ferguson Effect?” Google Searches, Concern about Police Violence, and Crime in U.S. Cities, 2014–2016

    Between 2014 and 2016, the rate of homicide and other violent crime in the United States rose. One hypothesis discussed in the press and by some social scientists is that this increase was tied to political mobilization against police violence: As the Black Lives Matter movement gained support following protests in Ferguson, Missouri, perhaps police officers, worried about the new public mood, scaled back their law enforcement efforts, with crime as a consequence.
  8. Contexts: The Politics of Performance

    Summer 2016 Vol. 15 No. 3

  9. Contexts: Science in Society

    Fall 2015 Vol. 14 No. 4

    The social and political entanglements of science, from climate change and medical marijuana to the origins of modern American sociology.

  10. Sources of Segregation in Social Networks: A Novel Approach Using Facebook

    <p>Most research on segregation in social networks considers small circles of strong ties, and little is known about segregation among the much larger number of weaker ties. This article proposes a novel approach to the study of these more extended networks, through the use of data on personal ties in an online social network. We illustrate this method’s potential by describing and explaining the degree of ethnic and gender segregation on Facebook among a representative survey of adolescents in the Netherlands (N = 2,810; ~1.1 million Facebook friends).