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  1. Disability and Qualitative Inquiry: Methods for Rethinking an Ableist World

    Contemporary Sociology, Volume 46, Issue 1, Page 36-37, January 2017.
  2. The Color Factor: The Economics of African-American Well-Being in the Nineteenth-Century South

    The Color Factor: The Economics of African-American Well-Being in the Nineteenth-Century South
  3. Time Reference in the Service of Social Action

    Social Psychology Quarterly, Volume 80, Issue 2, Page 109-131, June 2017.
  4. ASA Task Force on Contingent Faculty Interim Report

    The ASA Task Force on Contingent Faculty was appointed to address the changes in faculty employment and working conditions, career prospects for graduate students, and the consequences for higher education that have resulted from the increased reliance on contingent faculty. Contingent faculty, both part-time and full-time non-tenure track, have increased dramatically. By 2011 a majority of faculty were employed part-time.  Contingent faculty are least common at Ph.D.

  5. The [Un]Surprising Alt-Right

    by Robert Futrell and Pete Simi

    The night that Barack Obama was elected President in 2008, the White supremacist web forum Stormfront lit up with posts about racial extremists’ fantastical visions of violence to combat “White racial genocide.” On election night 2016, Stormfront lit up again as White supremacists expressed triumph with Donald Trump’s victory. They celebrated: “We finally have one of us in the White House again!”

  6. After Charlottesville: A Contexts Symposium

    In a joint editorial effort, the editors of Contexts have assembled a group of writers who specialize in research on race, racism, whiteness, nationalism, and immigration to provide sociological insights about how the public, politicians, and academics should process and understand the broader sociohistorical implications of the events in Charlottesville.

  7. Understanding Race After Charlottesville

    Race and white supremacy - topics many sociologists devote a great deal of research to and know well - have, again, become front page topics after violence broke out in Charlottesville last month. On Monday, September 18, the American Sociological Association, American Historical Association, American Anthropological Association, and Society for Applied Anthropology

  8. Inequality Frames: How Teachers Inhabit Color-blind Ideology

    This paper examines how public school teachers take up, modify, or resist the dominant ideology of color-blind racism. This examination is based on in-depth interviews with 60 teachers at three segregated schools: one was race/class privileged and two were disadvantaged. Inductive coding revealed that teachers at each school articulated a shared frame to talk about race and class: “legitimated advantage” at Heritage High School, “trickle-down dysfunction” at Bunker High School, and “antiracist dignity” at Solidarity High School.
  9. Thinking Globally, Interviewing Locally: Using an Intensive Interview Project to Teach Globalization and Social Change

    In this article, I connect globalization and qualitative methodological practice, describing a semester-long intensive interview project about the anti-apartheid movement. I provide a detailed overview of the project as well as considerations for those who might want to adapt it for their own courses. Using students’ reflections on the projects and their final papers, I demonstrate that this project successfully introduces students to a transnational social movement and provides valuable methodological practice.