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  1. From Systems Thinking to Systemic Action: Social Vulnerability and the Institutional Challenge of Urban Resilience

    From Systems Thinking to Systemic Action: Social Vulnerability and the Institutional Challenge of Urban Resilience

  2. Organizational Structure, Policy Learning, and Economic Performance: Evidence from the Chinese Commune

    Using original county-level panel data on Chinese communes over two decades, 1958 to 1979, this article builds upon existing theories about the influence of organizational size and structure on institutional performance. We found a consistent and robust interaction effect among the size of the commune (i.e., the coordination level) and its subunits, the brigade (i.e., the supervisory level) and production teams (i.e., the working level), on agricultural productivity.
  3. Facing the Great Recession in Deprived Urban Areas: How Civic Capacity Contributes to Neighborhood Resilience

    Research suggests that some communities are more resilient than others in the face of the same external stress. Both the local effects of and local responses to the 2008 financial collapse and economic recession have been geographically variegated. Drawing upon two case studies in the Metropolitan Region of Barcelona (Spain), this paper aims to understand why some historically deprived neighborhoods are proving more resilient than others in facing the effects of the Great Recession.

  4. Overcoming Spatial Mismatch: The Opportunities and Limits of Transit Mode in Addressing the Black‐White Unemployment Gap

    Spatial inequality is a central characteristic of U.S. metropolitan areas. Overcoming related employment disadvantages requires a broad set of responses: relocation, economic development, or an increase in mobility. Given the difficulty of widespread relocation or urban rebuilding programs, increasing mobility through transportation options may be a core solution in the short term. This article explains the racial gap in unemployment under spatial mismatch in the largest metropolitan areas by examining racial gaps in automobile access and public transit use.

  5. (Good) Debt is an Asset

    Raphael Charron-Chenier and Louise Seamster on debt and social inequality.
  6. Review Essays: A Sociology of the Global Economy

    In a short 15 years, international financial markets staggered from the sovereign debt crises of the early to mid-1990s (Russia, Mexico), to a regional financial crisis (Asian Financial Crisis), to a global crisis (the GreatRecession brought on by the 2008 financial collapses in the United States). All this has occurred at a time when the world seemed to become more economically interdependent
  7. Can Reducing Income Inequality Decouple Economic Growth from CO2 Emissions?

    In the past two decades, income inequality has steadily increased in most developed nations. During this same period, the growth rate of CO2 emissions has declined in many developed nations, cumulating to a recent period of decoupling between economic growth and CO2 emissions. The aim of the present study is to advance research on socioeconomic drivers of CO2 emissions by assessing how the distribution of income affects the relationship between economic growth and CO2 emissions.
  8. Early-life Medicaid Coverage and Intergenerational Economic Mobility

    New data reveal significant variation in economic mobility outcomes across U.S. localities. This suggests that social structures, institutions, and public policies—particularly those that influence critical early-life environments—play an important role in shaping mobility processes. Using new county-level estimates of intergenerational economic mobility for children born between 1980 and 1986, we exploit the uneven expansions of Medicaid eligibility across states to isolate the causal effect of this specific policy change on mobility outcomes.
  9. Memory Politics: Growth Coalitions, Urban Pasts, and the Creation of “Historic” Philadelphia

    Facing economic changes and disinvestment, powerful actors in post‐World War II American cities attempted to define the city as a space of public culture to confront demographic shifts, suburban growth, and the breakdown of community. Some civic actors, especially in older Eastern cities, looked to a nostalgic and heroic past where a theme of American identity became salient as a result of the Cold War and rapid cultural and economic changes in the postwar era. To achieve urban growth, elites argued for urban redevelopment policies based on historical themes and imagery.

  10. How to Read The Wealth of Nations (or Why the Division of Labor Is More Important Than Competition in Adam Smith)

    This article challenges the idea that competition was central to Adam Smith’s thinking by scrutinizing the concept’s role in Smith’s work, particularly The Wealth of Nations. We will understand Smith’s perspective better if we avoid reading later developments of the concept, particularly in economics, back into Smith’s times and writings. Conversely, I argue that the division of labor is the governing idea providing the basic organizational structure of Wealth of Nations.