American Sociological Association

Search

Search

The search found 133 results in 0.024 seconds.

Search results

  1. Religion among Scientists in International Context: A New Study of Scientists in Eight Regions

    Scientists have long been associated with religion’s decline around the world. But little data permit analysis of the religiosity of scientists or their perceptions of the science-faith interface.
  2. ASA President Writes Letter in Defense of Jan Tomasz Gross

    ASA President Michèle Lamont recently wrote President Andrzej Duda, Chancellery of the President of the Republic of Poland criticizing a new Polish law that significantly harms academic freedom. The law punishes those who study Poland's past and reach a well researched conclusion that is opposite to the Polish government's narrative. 

    Lamont urges that no charges be filed against Professor Gross. Gross has written about Poles complicity in the persecution of Jews during WWII.

  3. ASA President Eduardo Bonilla-Silva Responds to Chief Justice John Roberts

    Last week, Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts, during oral arguments in the gerrymandering case Gill v Whitford, referred to social science as "sociological gobbledygook." ASA President Eduardo Bonilla-Silva has responded in a letter, the content of which is below. You can also download a .pdf of the letter here


    Dear Chief Justice John Roberts:

  4. ASA Style Guide, 5th Edition

    The fifth edition of the ASA Style Guide is the authoritative reference for writing, submitting, editing, and copyediting manuscripts for ASA journals and other publications following ASA's unique format. This revised, expanded edition features guidelines for the most common situations encountered by authors and editors. New features include revisions to reference formatting and additional information on grammar. In addition, updated reference examples, including citing social media sources and journal articles posted online ahead of print, are included in this new edition.

  5. U.S. has 5 percent of world's population, but had 31 percent of its public mass shooters from 1966-2012

    Despite having only about 5 percent of the world's population, the United States was the attack site for a disproportionate 31 percent of public mass shooters globally from 1966-2012, according to research presented at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

  6. The 2018 March for Science

    Join your fellow sociologists for the 2nd annual March for Science on April 14, 2018. 

    In 2017, more than one million people around the world gathered together in the largest event for science advocacy in history, the March for Science.  The March for Science is a public celebration of science and a reminder of the important role evidence-based research plays in informing public policy.

  7. How to Think Scientifically about Scientists’ Proposals for Fixing Science

    Science is in crisis. Any doubt about this status has surely been dispelled by the loud assurances to the contrary by various authority figures who are deeply invested in the current system and have written things such as, “Psychology is not in crisis, contrary to popular rumor. . . . Crisis or no crisis, the field develops consensus about the most valuable insights. . . . National panels will convene and caution scientists, reviewers, and editors to uphold standards” (Fiske, Schacter, and Taylor 2016: v).
  8. Beyond Health Effects? Examining the Social Consequences of Community Levels of Uninsurance Pre-ACA

    The lack of health insurance is traditionally considered a problem faced by individuals and their families. However, because of the geographically bounded organization and funding of healthcare in the United States, levels of uninsurance in a community may affect everyone living there. Health economists have examined how the effects of uninsurance spillover from the uninsured to the insured, negatively affecting healthcare access and quality for the insured.
  9. In Case You Missed It: Webinar on Seeking Grants from Private Foundations

    Last month ASA offered an open access webinar, "Grant Seeking from Private Foundations: What Investigators Should Know," featuring program officers from three foundations that offer major funding for work in the social sciences: the Spencer Foundation, the William T. Grant Foundation, and the Russell Sage Foundation. In the webinar they described their current initiatives, their review processes, and provided concrete guidance on proposal preparation. Even if you missed the live webinar, you can still view the recording.  

  10. Fuck Nuance

    Nuance is not a virtue of good sociological theory. Although often demanded and superficially attractive, nuance inhibits the abstraction on which good theory depends. I describe three “nuance traps” common in sociology and show why they should be avoided on grounds of principle, aesthetics, and strategy. The argument is made without prejudice to the substantive heterogeneity of the discipline.