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  1. Trump’s Immigration Attacks, in Brief

    A look at the Trump administration’s attacks on Mexicans, Muslims, and unauthorized immigrants and how they’ve undermined longstanding policy and public perception.
  2. A Systematic Assessment of “Axial Age” Proposals Using Global Comparative Historical Evidence

    Proponents of the Axial Age contend that parallel cultural developments between 800 and 200 BCE in what is today China, Greece, India, Iran, and Israel-Palestine constitute the global historical turning point toward modernity. The Axial Age concept is well-known and influential, but deficiencies in the historical evidence and sociological analysis available have thwarted efforts to evaluate the concept’s major global contentions. As a result, the Axial Age concept remains controversial.
  3. Whose Moral Community? Religiosity, Secularity, and Self-rated Health across Communal Religious Contexts

    Scholars have long theorized that religious contexts provide health-promoting social integration and regulation. A growing body of literature has documented associations between individual religiosity and health as well as macro–micro linkages between religious contexts, religious participation, and individual health. Using unique data on individuals and county contexts in the United States, this study offers new insight by using multilevel analysis to examine meso–micro relationships between religion and health.
  4. Country-level Differences in the Effects of Financial Hardship on Life Satisfaction: The Role of Religious Context and Age-contingent Buffering

    Existing research suggests that financial hardship is negatively associated with life satisfaction. Largely absent from the literature, however, is an examination of whether this association varies across national context. Drawing on the sixth wave of the World Values Survey (2010–2014), this study assesses whether religious context moderates the association between financial hardship and life satisfaction. Moreover, it investigates how the moderating influences of religious context vary by age groups.
  5. Goal-striving Stress and Self-concept: The Moderating Role of Perceived Divine Control

    No study has investigated whether personal religiousness could modulate goal-striving stress. To address this gap in the literature, the current study tests whether beliefs in divine control moderate the associations between goal-striving stress and self-concept (i.e. self-esteem and mastery). I analyze cross-sectional data from Vanderbilt University’s Nashville Stress and Health Study (2011-2014), a probability sample of non-Hispanic black and white adults aged 22 to 69 living in Davidson County, Tennessee (n = 1,252).
  6. Gun Control in the Crosshairs: Christian Nationalism and Opposition to Stricter Gun Laws

    Despite increasingly frequent mass shootings and a growing dissatisfaction with current gun laws, American opposition to federal gun legislation remains strong. The authors show that opposition to stricter gun control is closely linked to Christian nationalism, a religious cultural framework that mandates a symbiotic relationship between Christianity and civil society. Using data from a national population-based survey, the authors show that Christian nationalism is an exceptionally strong predictor of opposition to the federal government’s enacting stricter gun laws.
  7. The Emergence of Statistical Objectivity: Changing Ideas of Epistemic Vice and Virtue in Science

    The meaning of objectivity in any specific setting reflects historically situated understandings of both science and self. Recently, various scientific fields have confronted growing mistrust about the replicability of findings, and statistical techniques have been deployed to articulate a “crisis of false positives.” In response, epistemic activists have invoked a decidedly economic understanding of scientists’ selves. This has prompted a scientific social movement of proposed reforms, including regulating disclosure of “backstage” research details and enhancing incentives for replication.
  8. Estimating Income Statistics from Grouped Data: Mean-constrained Integration over Brackets

    Researchers studying income inequality, economic segregation, and other subjects must often rely on grouped data—that is, data in which thousands or millions of observations have been reduced to counts of units by specified income brackets.
  9. Comment: The Inferential Information Criterion from a Bayesian Point of View

    As Michael Schultz notes in his very interesting paper (this volume, pp. 52–87), standard model selection criteria, such as the Akaike information criterion (AIC; Akaike 1974), the Bayesian information criterion (BIC; Schwarz 1978), and the minimum description length principle (MDL; Rissanen 1978), are purely empirical criteria in the sense that the score a model receives does not depend on how well the model coheres with background theory. This is unsatisfying because we would like our models to be theoretically plausible, not just empirically successful.
  10. The Problem of Underdetermination in Model Selection

    Conventional model selection evaluates models on their ability to represent data accurately, ignoring their dependence on theoretical and methodological assumptions. Drawing on the concept of underdetermination from the philosophy of science, the author argues that uncritical use of methodological assumptions can pose a problem for effective inference. By ignoring the plausibility of assumptions, existing techniques select models that are poor representations of theory and are thus suboptimal for inference.