American Sociological Association

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  1. Reconsidering Collective Efficacy: The Roles of Perceptions of Community and Strong Social Ties

    Collective efficacy is an often‐studied concept, yet theoretical differences and confusing terminology lead to an inability to translate the concept across disciplines. Utilizing a nationally representative sample, this study employs structural equation modeling combined with a series of hierarchical models to test the hypotheses that the focal independent variables of neighborhood perceptions, strong social ties, and civic engagement as a proxy for weak social ties are each positively associated with collective efficacy while controlling for sociodemographic characteristics.

  2. Complaining While Black: Racial Disparities in the Adjudication of Complaints Against the Police

    Reports of citizen complaints of police misconduct often note that officers are rarely disciplined for alleged misconduct. The perception of little officer accountability contributes to widespread distrust of law enforcement in communities of color. This project investigates how race and segregation shape the outcomes of allegations made against the Chicago Police Department (CPD) between 2011 and 2014. We find that complaints by black and Latino citizens and against white officers are less likely to be sustained.

  3. A Meta-Analysis of the Association between Income Inequality and Intergenerational Mobility

    We provide an overview of associations between income inequality and intergenerational mobility in the United States, Canada, and eight European countries. We analyze whether this correlation is observed across and within countries over time. We investigate Great Gatsby curves and perform metaregression analyses based on several papers on this topic. Results suggest that countries with high levels of inequality tend to have lower levels of mobility.

  4. “Just the Type with whom I Like to Work”: Two Correspondence Field Experiments in an Online Mental Health Care Market

    Two field experiments investigated discrimination in an online mental health care market. The subjects were 908 mental health care providers (MHPs) who advertise for clients on a website through which help-seekers email providers. Both studies measured MHPs’ receptiveness to an ostensibly black or white help-seeker requesting an appointment. In the first study, no racial or gender disparities were observed. However, help-seekers in the second study, who signaled lower education than those in the first, were confronted with significantly lower accessibility overall.
  5. Complementary and Alternative Medical Service Use for Mental Health Problems among Chinese Americans: The Roles of Acculturation-related Factors

    The author used data from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys to examine the 12-month prevalence and predictors of the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) relative to conventional Western medical services among Chinese Americans. The author examined the differences in service utilization patterns between Chinese Americans and non-Hispanic whites and the effects of acculturation factors such as generational status and English proficiency within the population of Chinese Americans.
  6. Pathways to Mental Health Services and Perceptions about the Effectiveness of Treatment

    The gap between need and effective treatment for mental health problems continues to be a challenge for researchers and policymakers. Much of the attention has been on differences in treatment rates, with insufficient attention to variation in pathways that people take into treatment. Individuals may choose to seek help but may also be substantially influenced by others or coerced into care. The chances of each type of pathway are influenced by social characteristics and may shape perceptions of effectiveness of care.
  7. Review Essay: See It with Figures

    The short story is that Kieran Healy’s Data Visualization: A Practical Introduction is a gentle introduction to the effective display of social science data using the R package ggplot2. It is beautifully put together, achingly clear, and effective.