American Sociological Association

Search

Search

The search found 223 results in 0.023 seconds.

Search results

  1. Welcome to the ASA Annual Meeting from President Michèle Lamont

    C’est avec grand plaisir que je vous acceuille dans mon bout de pays, “La Belle Province.” That we meet in Montréal to debate “Culture, Inequality, and Social Inclusion across the Globe” is particularly fitting as these very topics have been at the center of the construction of the Canadian community since 1608, in the context of multiple ethno-national and colonial conflicts. Today, many perceive Canadian society as exemplary when it comes to collective wellbeing, immigration policy, and multiculturalism.

  2. When DNA Evidence Challenges Ideas of A Person’s Racial Purity, White Supremacists Use a Decision Tree to Affirm or Discount the Results

    Now that science can determine a person’s racial and ethnic origins from a cheek swab, those devoted to ideas of racial “purity,” are employing methods of mind games and logic twists to support their beliefs despite facing evidence of their own multiracial heritage.

  3. Communicating Across Difference: Free and Responsible Speech

    Attacks on the speech of students, faculty, and visitors on college campuses have a long history. Not only are such attacks continuing, but social media has generated a climate in which campaigns of intimidation can be organized quickly and easily and the current political climate seems to have released the reins of restraint. Particularly troubling has been the disproportionate number of targets of intimidation campaigns who are scholars from historically marginalized populations, including people of color and members of the LGBTQ community.  

  4. Understanding Feminist Activism among Women: Resources, Consciousness, and Social Networks

    This study examines whether women’s feminist activism is connected to three key factors: sufficient educational and financial resources, the internalization of a feminist consciousness, and being involved in feminist mobilization structures. Analysis of the 2012 American National Election Survey (N = 1,876) suggests that participation and engagement in the women’s movement is least common among less educated women and stay-at-home mothers.
  5. Relationships between the Public and Crimmigration Entities in North Carolina: A 287(g) Program Focus

    How does local law enforcement, with the aid of city and county governments, respond to racialized immigrant threat through policy implementation, namely, through adoption of intergovernmental agreements? More specifically, how is this response tailored for Latino immigrant communities, particularly in new destination communities?
  6. Activating Politics with Poetry and Spoken Word

    Millennial activism, so often maligned, finds new purchase in a revival of spoken word poetry as an adaptable advocacy, organizing, and mobilizing tool.

  7. Black Lives and Police Tactics Matter

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 3, Page 20-25, Summer 2017.
  8. Book Review: Journey into Social Activism: Qualitative Approaches

    In a preliminary content analysis of articles in the top social movement journals, Atkinson finds that scholars of social activism typically use a broad range of qualitative research methodologies. However, scholars of activism rarely elaborate on the methods they use. Similarly, previous research has largely failed to bring together and critically assess the qualitative methodologies used to study social activism.
  9. A New Political Generation: Millennials and the Post-2008 Wave of Protest

    Building on Karl Mannheim’s theory of generations, this address argues that U.S. Millennials comprise a new political generation with lived experiences and worldviews that set them apart from their elders. Not only are they the first generation of “digital natives,” but, although they are more educated than any previous U.S. generation, they face a labor market in which precarity is increasingly the norm.
  10. Policy Entrepreneurs and the Origins of the Regulatory Welfare State: Child Labor Reform in Nineteenth-Century Europe

    Industrial child labor laws were the earliest manifestation of the modern regulatory welfare state. Why, despite the absence of political pressure from below, did some states (but not others) succeed in legislating working hours, minimum ages, and schooling requirements for working children in the first half of the nineteenth century? I use case studies of the politics behind the first child labor laws in Germany and France, alongside a case study of a failed child labor reform effort in Belgium, to answer this question.