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  1. Keep Your Enemies Close? Study Finds Greater Proximity to Opponents Leads to More Polarization

    Encouraging adversaries to have more interpersonal contact to find common ground may work on occasion, but not necessarily in the U.S. Senate, according to new research.

  2. Women More Likely Than Men to Initiate Divorces, But Not Non-Marital Breakups

    Women are more likely than men to initiate divorces, but women and men are just as likely to end non-marital relationships, according to a new study that will be presented at the 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

  3. Richard Carpiano and Brian Kelly to Lead JHSB

    The editorship of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior (JHSB), the ASA’s premier general medical sociology journal, will transition at the end of this year from Gilbert Gee to Richard Carpiano and Brian Kelly.

  4. Bartending and Family Life Might Not Mix, Study Says

    If you want to mix drinks for a living, don’t expect to have a typical family life.

    That was the conclusion of a study by Tulane University sociologists Emily Starr and Alicia McCraw, who interviewed 40 New Orleans area bartenders for their study, “Barkeeps and Barmaids on the White Picket Fence: Bartenders, Gender, and Performative Adulthood,” which they presented at the 111th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

  5. Troubled Teens in Therapeutic Boarding School Adopt Atypical Gender Behaviors to Reassert Dominance

    While studying the rapid growth of the therapeutic boarding school industry, Jessica A. Pfaffendorf observed that troubled young men in at least one program most often displayed a type of “hybrid masculinity.”

    This observation — young men incorporating more feminine behaviors in their social interactions while at boarding school — presented a notable incongruence.

  6. Americans Think Sex Should Determine Chores for Straight Couples, Masculinity and Femininity For Same-Sex Couples

    For heterosexual couples, most Americans still believe in the traditional division of household labor between husbands and wives, while for same-sex couples, they think the “more masculine” partner and the “more feminine” partner should generally be responsible for stereotypically male and female chores, respectively, suggests a new study that was presented at the 111th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).   

  7. Trust Is Key Motivator for Individuals Who Protest on Behalf of People Different From Them

    It appears that people who actively participate in demonstrations during social movements on behalf of those dissimilar to them do so for two important reasons.

    First, they trust their outgroup peers. Secondly, the political climate in their home countries actually fosters both trust and political engagement, and this is particularly true in countries with well-functioning political institutions.

  8. Study Shows How a Community’s Culture and Social Connectedness Can Increase Suicide Risk

    Community characteristics play an important role in perpetuating teen suicide clusters and thwarting prevention efforts, according to a new study by sociologists at the University of Chicago (UChicago) and University of Memphis who examined clusters in a single town.

  9. Protests with Many Participants and Unified Message Most Likely to Influence Politicians, Study Suggests

    Protests that bring many people to the streets who agree among themselves and have a single message are most likely to influence elected officials, suggests a new study.

    “We found that features of a protest can alter the calculations of politicians and how they view an issue,” said Ruud Wouters, an assistant professor of political communication and journalism at the University of Amsterdam and the lead author of the study. “More specifically, the number of participants and unity are the characteristics of a protest that have the greatest ability to change politicians’ opinions.”

  10. Journal of Health and Social Behavior: Forty Years of Medical Sociology

    Journal of Health and Social Behavior: Forty Years of Medical Sociology