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  1. Troubled Teens in Therapeutic Boarding School Adopt Atypical Gender Behaviors to Reassert Dominance

    While studying the rapid growth of the therapeutic boarding school industry, Jessica A. Pfaffendorf observed that troubled young men in at least one program most often displayed a type of “hybrid masculinity.”

    This observation — young men incorporating more feminine behaviors in their social interactions while at boarding school — presented a notable incongruence.

  2. Americans Think Sex Should Determine Chores for Straight Couples, Masculinity and Femininity For Same-Sex Couples

    For heterosexual couples, most Americans still believe in the traditional division of household labor between husbands and wives, while for same-sex couples, they think the “more masculine” partner and the “more feminine” partner should generally be responsible for stereotypically male and female chores, respectively, suggests a new study that was presented at the 111th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).   

  3. Trust Is Key Motivator for Individuals Who Protest on Behalf of People Different From Them

    It appears that people who actively participate in demonstrations during social movements on behalf of those dissimilar to them do so for two important reasons.

    First, they trust their outgroup peers. Secondly, the political climate in their home countries actually fosters both trust and political engagement, and this is particularly true in countries with well-functioning political institutions.

  4. Study Examines Families’ Journeys to Accepting Transgender Children, Mothers Play Key Advocacy Role

    A tiny hair barrette and an anguished moment marked the turning point for one mother in coming to fully accept that her child, who was born a boy, was a transgender girl.

    Quinn had expressed a preference for girls’ clothing and accessories at a young age, but Jessica and her husband, Steve, would not allow her to wear them outside their home.

    One day, picking her up from school, Jessica watched Quinn quickly remove a barrette from her hair and slip it into her pocket, ashamed that her mother might have seen.

  5. Taking Time-Off Work to Raise Children is Damaging to the Careers of Highly Skilled, High Earning Women

    Mothers who leave work to raise children often sacrifice more than the pay for their time off; when they come back their wages reflect lost raises, according to a new study by Paula England, Professor of Sociology at New York University.

  6. Contexts: Trump365

    Contexts
    Winter 2018, Vol. 17, No. 1

    Features include "After Charlottesville", "Ethnonationalism and the Rise of Donald Trump", "Trump’s Immigration Attacks, in Brief", "Making Protest Great Again", "Emasculation, Conservatism, and the 2016 Election", "Maintaining Supremacy by Blocking Affirmative Action", and "The Algorithmic Rise of the “Alt-Right."