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  1. “An Earnest Desire for the Truth despite Its Possible Unpleasantness”: A Comparative Analysis of the Atlanta University Publications and American Journal of Sociology, 1895 to 1917

    The authors examine the methodological sophistication of the research conducted by the W.E.B. Du Bois–led Atlanta Sociological Laboratory (ASL), the first American school of sociology, and Albion Small–edited American Journal of Sociology (AJS). Comparative analysis of the ASL publications and scholarly articles in AJS between 1895 and 1917 is undertaken to identify articulations of the method(s) of research offered in both. The authors conclude that the articulation of research methods by the ASL is superior to those from AJS.
  2. Why Is There No Labor Party in the United States? Political Articulation and the Canadian Comparison, 1932 to 1948

    Why is there no labor party in the United States? This question has had deep implications for U.S. politics and social policy. Existing explanations use "reflection" models of parties, whereby parties reflect preexisting cleavages or institutional arrangements. But a comparison with Canada, whose political terrain was supposedly more favorable to labor parties, challenges reflection models.

  3. Working at the Intersection of Race and Public Policy: The Promise (and Perils) of Putting Research to Work for Societal Transformation

    Today, race and ethnicity scholars generate a wealth of important research that documents the parameters of racial and/or ethnic inequality, how such inequality persists, and how it relates to, or intersects with, other dimensions of social life. Here we argue that these scholars should devote their abundant intellectual energies not only to illuminating the parameters and causes of racial injustice but also to producing work that might shift popular understandings and stimulate change.

  4. RaceBaitR Talks #HistoryByHillary, Queerness

    Steven W. Thrasher and genderqueer activist Hari Ziyad on calling out hypocrisy and fighting racism without engaging racists.

  5. A “Real” American Indian

    Kimberly R. Huyser considers the power of stereotypes and self-image as she participates in a project to create modern images of Native Americans.
  6. How Environmental Decline Restructures Indigenous Gender Practices: What Happens to Karuk Masculinity When There Are No Fish?

    On the Klamath River in northern California, Karuk tribal fishermen traditionally provide salmon for food and ceremonies, yet the region has sustained serious environmental degradation in recent years. What happens to Karuk masculinity when there are no fish? Using interviews and public testimony, the authors examine how declining salmon runs affect the gender identities and practices of Karuk fishermen. Gendered practices associated with fishing serve ecological functions, perpetuate culture in the face of structural genocide, and unite families and communities.
  7. Velvet Rope Racism, Racial Paranoia, and Cultural Scripts: Alleged Dress Code Discrimination in Urban Nightlife, 2000–2014

    Using news stories appearing between June 1, 2000, and June 15, 2014, I explore the nature of African Americans’ allegations of racial discrimination in the use of dress codes at urban nightclubs. In this qualitative analysis I outline the nature of these incidents and the extent to which they represent what I refer to as “velvet rope racism”. I focus on how these incidents are negotiated between patrons and nightclub management, observing that owners who face allegations of racial discrimination turn to cultural scripts to make counterclaims to allegations.

  8. After Charlottesville

    Essays explore Americans’ construction and deconstruction of collective memory as White supremacists take to the streets.
  9. Beneath the Surface of White Supremacy: Denaturalizing U.S. Racisms Past and Present

    In the age of Black Lives Matter, the urge to understand why and how racism has been perpetuated in American society has never been more urgent. Opening with yet another tragic story of the police shooting of an unarmed Black youth, Moon-Kie Jung’s most recent book is a timely addition to the theoretical understanding of racial inequalities and domination. Jung challenges the dominant and unquestioned assumptions about racism and develops new analytical concepts and theories to rethink racism and white supremacy from the past to the present.

  10. Contexts: Trump365

    Contexts
    Winter 2018, Vol. 17, No. 1

    Features include "After Charlottesville", "Ethnonationalism and the Rise of Donald Trump", "Trump’s Immigration Attacks, in Brief", "Making Protest Great Again", "Emasculation, Conservatism, and the 2016 Election", "Maintaining Supremacy by Blocking Affirmative Action", and "The Algorithmic Rise of the “Alt-Right."