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  1. Advantaged/Disadvantaged School Neighborhoods, Parental Networks, and Parental Involvement at Elementary School

    This article examines the relationship between parental networks and parental school involvement during the elementary school years. Using a large, nationally representative data set of elementary school students—the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study–Kindergarten Cohort—and contextual data from the 2000 U.S. Census, our multilevel analysis shows that higher levels of parental networks in first grade are associated with higher levels of parental school involvement in third grade after controlling for individual- and school-level characteristics.
  2. Forced and Coerced Cesarean Sections in the United States

    The rise of the c-section is tied not to maternal or fetal outcomes, but to organizational and legal imperatives. To those ends, a woman’s rights to bodily integrity and decision-making–even the right to refuse surgery–are frequently challenged in childbirth.

  3. Where Punishment and Pregnancy Meet

    Megan Comfort speaks with Carolyn Sufrin, author of Jailcare: Finding the Safety Net for Women Behind Bars.

  4. The Spillover of Genomic Testing Results in Families: Same Variant, Different Logics

    Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Volume 58, Issue 2, Page 166-180, June 2017.
  5. Why Is There No Labor Party in the United States? Political Articulation and the Canadian Comparison, 1932 to 1948

    Why is there no labor party in the United States? This question has had deep implications for U.S. politics and social policy. Existing explanations use "reflection" models of parties, whereby parties reflect preexisting cleavages or institutional arrangements. But a comparison with Canada, whose political terrain was supposedly more favorable to labor parties, challenges reflection models.

  6. Working at the Intersection of Race and Public Policy: The Promise (and Perils) of Putting Research to Work for Societal Transformation

    Today, race and ethnicity scholars generate a wealth of important research that documents the parameters of racial and/or ethnic inequality, how such inequality persists, and how it relates to, or intersects with, other dimensions of social life. Here we argue that these scholars should devote their abundant intellectual energies not only to illuminating the parameters and causes of racial injustice but also to producing work that might shift popular understandings and stimulate change.

  7. The Business of Egg and Sperm Donation

    The Business of Egg and Sperm Donation

  8. The Diaper Dilemma

    Just before he left office, Barack Obama proposed a $10 million federal initiative to test potential projects aimed at increasing low-income families’ access to diapers. The funding was never administered. States have tried, too: in September 2016, by a vote of 54-12, the California Assembly passed the first state-level diaper assistance bill. It would have provided $50 monthly diaper vouchers to cover the 120,000 children receiving state welfare aid, but the governor, Jerry Brown, vetoed it, citing the bill’s $120 million price tag.

  9. Race, Class, and the Framing of Drug Epidemics

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 4, Page 46-51, Fall 2017.
  10. Stay-at-Home Fatherhoods

    Nazneen Kane on the many motivations driving choices to father full-time.

    I was the only mom at the park, outnumbered not by nannies and babysitters but by stay-at-home fathers. Unlike my Washington, D.C. neighborhood, where privileged children were customarily tended by European au pairs and stay-at-home mothers, the children at this park in Cincinnati, Ohio were hanging out with their dads while mom acted as the primary breadwinner.