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  1. Rupture and Rhythm: A Phenomenology of National Experiences

    This article investigates how people make sense of ruptures in the flow of everyday life as they enter new experiential domains. Shifts in being-in-time create breaks in the natural attitude that offer the opportunity to register national—or, for example, religious, gender, or class—experiences. People interpret ruptures in perception and proprioception by drawing connections with domains in which similar or contrasting kinds of disruption are evident.
  2. Film Review: My So-called Enemy

    My So-called Enemy, directed by Lisa Gossels, follows six Palestinian and Israeli teenage girls over a period of seven years (2002–2009). These women participated in a woman’s leadership program called Building Bridges for Peace back in 2002. The girls come from various religious backgrounds and have varying experiences of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The girls, who live only a few hours from each other in the Middle East, travel to Bridgeton, New Jersey, to rediscover the humanity of their “enemy” and learn about the narrative(s) of the “other” in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
  3. Punishment, Religion, and the Shrinking Welfare State for the Very Poor in the United States, 1970–2010

    Punishment, Religion, and the Shrinking Welfare State for the Very Poor in the United States, 1970–2010
  4. American Religion, All or Nothing at All

    Most Contexts readers will know that in recent years Americans became less attached to organized religion. The 2016 General Social Survey (GSS) estimated that 22% of adults preferred no religion, up from 21% in 2014, 14% in 2004, 9% in 1994, and 7% in both 1984 and 1974. This strong trend invites the inference that American religion is declining rapidly. But no single trend can give a complete view of a complicated institution. The rise of the “nones” is interesting, in part, because it is the most extreme evidence of religious decline in the United States.

  5. Traditional, Modern, and Post-Secular Perspectives on Science and Religion in the United States

    Using General Social Survey data, we examine perspectives on science and religion in the United States. Latent class analysis reveals three groups based on knowledge and attitudes about science, religiosity, and preferences for certain religious interpretations of the world. The traditional perspective (43 percent) is marked by a preference for religion compared to science; the modern perspective (36 percent) holds the opposite view. A third perspective, which we call post-secular (21 percent), views both science and religion favorably.

  6. Marrying Social Activism and Spiritual Seeking

    Eve Fox speaks with Elizabeth Lesser about founding a prominent center for holistic learning.

  7. Love Wins?

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 1, Page 30-35, Winter 2016.
  8. Muslim Punk in an Alt-Right Era

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 3, Page 63-65, Summer 2017.
  9. Endogenous Dynamics in Contentious Fields: Evidence from the Shareholder Activism Network, 2006–2013

    Endogenous Dynamics in Contentious Fields: Evidence from the Shareholder Activism Network, 2006–2013
  10. Religiosity and Muslim Women’s Employment in the United States

    Does Muslim women’s religiosity deter them from paid work outside the home? I extend this question to Muslims in the United States, where the Muslim community is both ethnically and socioeconomically diverse and where this question has not yet been answered. I pool data from the 2007 and 2011 Pew Research Center surveys of American Muslims, the only large, nationally representative samples of Muslims in the United States, and use logistic regression models to analyze the relationship between religiosity and Muslim women’s employment.