American Sociological Association

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  1. Contexts: Untethered

    Fall 2016 Vol. 15 No. 4

    Features include "Financial Foreclosures," "Fat Eggs or Fit Bodies," "God's Case for Sex," "Revisiting the Rationing of Medical Degrees in the United States," and "Activating Politics with Poetry and Spoken Word."

  2. Contexts: Moving through Time and Space

    Summer 2015 Vol. 14 No. 3

    Sociology is all about putting people—their identities and their interactions—in social contexts. And those contexts are nested in the inescapable intersections of time and space.

  3. Contexts: Suspect Evidence

    Winter 2016 Vol. 15 No. 1

    Evidence is important. Even the most skeptical rely on tested and re-tested scientific certainty every day. And good sociologists hold scientific evidence suspect even as we use the best we have to make the decisions we must.

  4. Contexts: Reckoning

    Contexts
    Summer 2017 Vol. 16 No. 3

    Features include "Black Lives and police Tactics Matter", "Who Would Eat Such a Fish", "The Hidden Privilege in "Potty Politics", and "Glory and Gore."

  5. Coronavirus and the Inequity of Accountability for At-Home Learning (Children and Youth)

    To slow the spread of the coronavirus, schools across the United States are expecting students to continue learning at home. That means attending real-time class meetings, completing worksheets and online modules, and even taking exams online. Unfortunately, some schools are also holding students accountable for at-home learning, basing grades, course placements, and college eligibility on work completed at home. That accountability, I will argue, has the potential to exacerbate longstanding inequalities in school.

  6. Lessons in Finding Consensus (Environmental Sociology)

    The work of a non-profit in rural Montana, Blackfoot Challenge (BC), to coordinate a community response to threats posed by carnivores, can provide insight on how to manage the social dynamics of the pandemic. A grizzly bear and a coronavirus are quite different, but collective action is needed to handle both, requiring agreement on the definition of the problem and enough participation in the solutions that they are effective.