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  1. Study Explores Why There Is No Labor Party in the United States

    The improbable rise of Bernie Sanders' presidential campaign presents an interesting question: why is Sanders, a self-proclaimed "democratic socialist," running as a Democrat? "In any other industrialized country, Sanders would likely be the standard-bearer for a labor or social democratic party," said McGill University sociologist Barry Eidlin, whose new study appears in the June issue of the American Sociological Review. "But the U.S. famously lacks such a party."

  2. Relationships With Family Members, But Not Friends, Decrease Likelihood of Death

    For older adults, having more or closer family members in one’s social network decreases his or her likelihood of death, but having a larger or closer group of friends does not, finds a new study that was presented at the 111th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

  3. Does Owning a Well Foster Environmental Citizenship? A New Study Provides Evidence

    Kansans who own water wells show more awareness of state water policy issues than those who rely on municipal water supplies, according to a study that could have implications for groundwater management and environmental policies. 

    Brock Ternes, a University of Kansas doctoral student in sociology, found that well owners prioritized issues related to the depletion of the High Plains Aquifer — which is the underground reservoir of freshwater beneath much of the western half of the state. 

  4. Contexts: Untethered

    Fall 2016 Vol. 15 No. 4

    Features include "Financial Foreclosures," "Fat Eggs or Fit Bodies," "God's Case for Sex," "Revisiting the Rationing of Medical Degrees in the United States," and "Activating Politics with Poetry and Spoken Word."

  5. Contagious Addiction: Opioid Prescriptions Increase Likelihood of Family Members’ Use

    Contact: Naomi Paiss, Communications Director, at (202) 247-9859, npaiss@asanet.org, or (202) 440-0875 (cell); Johanna Olexy, Senior Communications Associate, at (202) 247-9873, communications@asanet.org, or (202) 251-6251 (cell).

    Washington, DC.  While opioid addiction and abuse continues to figure as the most serious public health emergency in the U.S., academic research is increasingly able to identify some of its causes.