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  1. Communicating Across Difference: Free and Responsible Speech

    Attacks on the speech of students, faculty, and visitors on college campuses have a long history. Not only are such attacks continuing, but social media has generated a climate in which campaigns of intimidation can be organized quickly and easily and the current political climate seems to have released the reins of restraint. Particularly troubling has been the disproportionate number of targets of intimidation campaigns who are scholars from historically marginalized populations, including people of color and members of the LGBTQ community.  

  2. Summer 2017 Contexts Online Free until Nov. 4

    Letter from the Editors

    As we write, millions of Texans are struggling through a hurricane for which we had years of warning. The president took a break from bragging about how great the government’s response to the hurricane was (it wasn’t) to pardon a racist sheriff who waged a campaign of state-sponsored terror against immigrants. Trump reiterated that transgender personnel are to be kicked out of the military, while Trump’s generals renewed the military’s commitment to never-ending war in Afghanistan. And that’s just one weekend in August.

  3. 2018 ASA President Eduardo Bonilla-Silva

    by David G. Embrick, University of Connecticut

    Eduardo Bonilla-Silva, Professor of Sociology at Duke University, is more than a dedicated scholar. He is a mentor to many.

  4. Fall 2017 Contexts Online Free until January 12

    Letter from the Editors

    Now it’s time to say goodbye,

    To all our company…

    So after 12 spectacular issues, lots of great web-only content, and a new edition of The Contexts Reader on the way, we’re heading into the sunset to make way for the new editors, Rashawn Ray and Fabio Rojas.

  5. Race, Class, and the Framing of Drug Epidemics

    by Rebecca Tiger in the Fall 2017 Contexts

    As America’s opiate epidemic rages on, calls for “treatment not punishment” dominate the national media. The hypocrisy of this response is not lost on a range of commentators: the reported move away from criminalization, they argue, is yet another example of racist drug policy. White people get treatment and poor people of color get punishment. Again.

  6. Krystale Littlejohn Discusses Research Published in JHSB

    In a new podcast, Krystale Littlejohn discusses her article, "Contesting and Differentially Constructing Uncertainty: Negotiations of Contraceptive Use in the Clinical Encounter," co-authored by Katrina Kimport. The article is published in the December 2017 issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

    Listen to the podcast

  7. ASA Signs on to Letters to Congress Regarding Spending Caps

    On February 6, ASA signed on to a letter from the Task Force on American Innovation—a broad nonpartisan coalition—that was sent to U.S. congressional leadership, regarding 302(b) allocation. These allocations establish the cap on spending for each of the appropriations bills. The letter's 95 undersigned businesses, scientific and engineering societies, and universities--each a fundamental part of the U.S.

  8. ASA Signs on to Letter Asking Congress to Support and Fund Gun Violence Research

    On Friday, March 2, ASA signed on to a letter from the March for Science asking Congress to approve the funding and support the nation needs to make evidence-based policies to prevent gun violence a reality. The letter frames gun violence as a public health issue. The letter states:

  9. ASA Fights Against Adding Citizenship Question to Census

    The Trump Administration has announced that a question on citizenship status will be included on the 2020 Census.  This will fundamentally compromise the integrity of the census. 

  10. Spring 2018 Contexts Online Free until July 15

    Letter from the Editors

    Education is a central feature of our lives. Collectively, our society invests billions of dollars in schools and colleges, with the hope that they act as transformative institutions that create a society of educated and productive citizens. Most of us will spend 12 to 16 years in school—often many more. And if we have children, we obsess over their homework, their schools’ scorecards, and the doors education will open for each generation.