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  1. Planning for Future Care and the End of Life: A Qualitative Analysis of Gay, Lesbian, and Heterosexual Couples

    Two key components of end-of-life planning are (1) informal discussions about future care and other end-of-life preferences and (2) formal planning via living wills and other legal documents. We leverage previous work on the institutional aspects of marriage and on sexual-minority discrimination to theorize why and how heterosexual, gay, and lesbian married couples engage in informal and formal end-of-life planning. We analyze qualitative dyadic in-depth interviews with 45 midlife gay, lesbian, and heterosexual married couples (N = 90 spouses).
  2. Film Review: Alive Inside: A Story of Music and Memory

    Population aging and its common health dynamics have become immensely important topics for student learning in the social and clinical sciences alike. Societies around the globe are shifting over to a more balanced distribution of older and younger members due to numerous shifts in health care, family planning, infrastructure development, and other phenomena. On average, populations around the world have gotten older as people have lived longer and reproduced less. Consequently, responding to aging both socially and clinically has been a top priority.
  3. Race-Ethnicity, Poverty, Urban Stressors, and Telomere Length in a Detroit Community-based Sample

    Residents of distressed urban areas suffer early aging-related disease and excess mortality. Using a community-based participatory research approach in a collaboration between social researchers and cellular biologists, we collected a unique data set of 239 black, white, or Mexican adults from a stratified, multistage probability sample of three Detroit neighborhoods. We drew venous blood and measured telomere length (TL), an indicator of stress-mediated biological aging, linking respondents’ TL to their community survey responses.

  4. Policy Entrepreneurs and the Origins of the Regulatory Welfare State: Child Labor Reform in Nineteenth-Century Europe

    Industrial child labor laws were the earliest manifestation of the modern regulatory welfare state. Why, despite the absence of political pressure from below, did some states (but not others) succeed in legislating working hours, minimum ages, and schooling requirements for working children in the first half of the nineteenth century? I use case studies of the politics behind the first child labor laws in Germany and France, alongside a case study of a failed child labor reform effort in Belgium, to answer this question.
  5. Spain’s Crisis Architecture

    Max Holleran on the political contingency of grandiose architecture.

  6. Dueling Interpretations of the Professional Organizing Industry

    Professional organizers are depicted, in pop culture, as clutter cops, but see themselves, in real life, as helping others prioritize and make peace with the stuff of their lives.

  7. Normal Unpredictability and the Chaos in Our Lives

    On the normal unpredictability of low-wage work.

  8. Dorothea Lange and the Art of the Caption

    How Depression Era photographer Dorothea Lange helped pioneer sociological storytelling with her evocative captions.

  9. RaceBaitR Talks #HistoryByHillary, Queerness

    Steven W. Thrasher and genderqueer activist Hari Ziyad on calling out hypocrisy and fighting racism without engaging racists.

  10. Domestic Workers Refusing Neo-Slavery in the UAE

    Dubai’s Kafala system regulates the lives, labors, and mobility of migrant domestic workers who have seen no new rights with reforms. this is how they resist.