American Sociological Association

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  1. Revisiting the Rationing of Medical Degrees in the United States

    Degree rationing is good for U.S. med school graduates, even as it exacerbates physician shortages.

  2. Religion, Migration, and Change in a European City

    A sociologist of religion, culture, and globalization captures all three at work in Antwerp.

  3. Review Essays: Understanding Mexican Immigration in a New Way

    Richard Alba reviews On the Move: Changing Mechanisms of Mexico-U.S. Migration, by Filiz Garip.
  4. Rust Belt Boomerang: The Pull of Place in Moving Back to a Legacy City

    Research and journalistic accounts on the Rust Belt consistently focus on population decline and its consequences. As a result, we know little about the growing trend of return migration of young professionals and knowledge workers to the region. Why have these individuals chosen to return to a place that they once left? I answer this question using in-depth interviews with young professionals who have moved back to Youngstown, Ohio. Results indicate that return migrants chose to return despite reporting alternative and perhaps more economically rational work opportunities elsewhere.

  5. Older People's Self-Selected Spaces of Encounter in Urban Aging Environments in the Netherlands

    Using a narrative methodology involving 216 older people in six urban aging environments in the Netherlands, we examined how they use and experience (semi-)public spaces as spaces of encounter, and the meanings they derive from using and experiencing these spaces. The research shows that, first, older people prefer commercial spaces like shopping malls to planned and designed activity spaces in care homes or neighborhood centers. Second, older people struggle with the transformations that have taken place in urban social life since they were young adults.

  6. Racializing “Illegality”: An Intersectional Approach to Understanding How Mexican-origin Women Navigate an Anti-immigrant Climate

    By shedding light on how Mexicans are racialized, scholars have brought racism to the forefront of migration research. Still, less is known about how “illegality” complicates racialized experiences, and even less is known about how gender and class further complicate this process. Drawing on 60 interviews with Mexican-origin women in Houston, Texas, this research explores how documented and Mexican American women are racialized, the institutional contexts in which this process occurs, and how women’s racialized experiences relate to feelings of belonging and exclusion.
  7. Contextualizing Cambodia

    Hollie Nyseth Brehm talks to Keith Chhe about escaping genocide and leaving his country–and its identity–behind.

  8. Immigrant Rights are Civil Rights

    Black-brown coalition activism is changing hearts, minds, and legislation in Missouri and across the American South.

  9. Celebrating New Citizens, Defining the Nation

    Exploring naturalization ceremonies as sites of Durkheimian ritual, creating social solidarity and shaping stories of the nation.

  10. Film Review: abUSed: The Postville Raid

    AbUSed tells the story of how an immigration raid frightened and economically devastated a small town in Iowa. The film is engaging and students learn not only about what happened on that day but also about the inner workings of immigration law. The film provides various perspectives on what happened in Postville on Friday, May 9, 2008. We hear from faith and community leaders, migration experts, lawyers, employees, shopkeepers, and community members.