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  1. Pressure to 'Publish or Perish' May Discourage Innovative Research, Study Suggests

    The traditional pressure in academia for faculty to "publish or perish" advances knowledge in established areas. But it also might discourage scientists from asking the innovative questions that are most likely to lead to the biggest breakthroughs, according to a new study spearheaded by a UCLA professor.

  2. People in Their 60s Uniquely Benefit From Giving Advice Despite Fewer Chances to Offer it

    A new study reveals that individuals in their 60s who give advice to a broad range of people tend to see their lives as especially meaningful. At the same time, this happens to be the age when opportunities for dispensing advice become increasingly scarce.

  3. Getting the Most Out of the U.S. Healthcare System

    Kids with life-threatening illnesses need cutting-edge technology and medical expertise, but families face uneven access and paths to such care.

  4. Dealing with the Diagnosis

    How naming a medical malady can be both horrifying for new parents and a key to unlocking resources and care.

  5. Through the Contested Terrain: Implementation of Downsizing Announcements by Large U.S. Firms, 1984 to 2005

    Since the 1980s, leading U.S. firms have announced massive downsizing plans in the name of maximizing shareholder value, but some observers are skeptical about how serious firms are in implementing these plans. Building on political theories of corporate governance, I examine how conflicts of interest and alignment among investors, workers, and top managers affect the implementation of announced downsizing plans.

  6. The Great and the Small: The Impact of Collective Action on the Evolution of Board Interlocks after the Panic of 1907

    Conventional research in organizational theory highlights the role of board interlocks in facilitating business collective action. In this article, I propose that business collective action affects the evolutionary path of interlock networks. In particular, large market players’ response after a collective action to the classic problem of the "exploitation" of the great by the small provides a mechanism for interlocks to evolve.

  7. Ripples of Fear: The Diffusion of a Bank Panic

    Community reactions against organizations can be driven by negative information spread through a diffusion process that is distinct from the diffusion of organizational practices. Bank panics offer a classic example of selective diffusion of negative information. Bank panics involve widespread bank runs, although a low proportion of banks experience a run. We develop theory on how organizational similarity, community similarity, and network proximity create selective diffusion paths for resistance against organizations.

  8. Civic Stratification and the Exclusion of Undocumented Immigrants from Cross-border Health Care

    This paper proposes a theoretical framework and an empirical example of the relationship between the civic stratification of immigrants in the United States, and their access to healthcare. We use the 2007 Pew Hispanic Center/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Hispanic Healthcare Survey, a nationally representative survey of U.S. Latinos (N = 2,783 foreign-born respondents) and find that immigrants who are not citizens or legal permanent residents are significantly more likely to be excluded from care in both the United States and across borders.

  9. Do Fathers Sexual Behaviors Vary with the Sex of Firstborns? Evidence from 37 Countries

    This article investigates whether men’s sexual behavior is influenced by the sex of their firstborn children and, if so, at what stage of firstborns’ development this occurs. Using standardized data from 37 Demographic and Health Surveys (N = 61,801), I compare the sexual activities, sexually transmitted infection symptoms, and sexual ideologies of fathers with firstborn sons and fathers with firstborn daughters. I also explore whether fathers’ attitudes mediate the effects of firstborn sex.

  10. The Age-Graded Nature of Advice: Distributional Patterns and Implications for Life Meaning

    Drawing from life course, social networks, and developmental social psychology scholarship, this article considers how advice transmission varies across age groups and examines the age-contingent associations between advice-giving and life meaning. Binomial and ordered logistic regression using the 2006 Portraits of American Life Study (n = 2,583) reveal that adults in their twenties are most likely to report offering advice to multiple social targets.