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  1. Class and Inequality in Piketty

    Erik Olin Wright on last year's best-seller, Capital in the Twenty-First Century.

  2. Normal Unpredictability and the Chaos in Our Lives

    On the normal unpredictability of low-wage work.

  3. The Year English Soccer Wasn’t For Sale

    In the 2015/2016 season, the close link between big budgets and soccer dominance broke down in the English Premier League. Here, a look at what motivated the surprise and why American-style sport socialism still isn’t likely to emerge in European leagues.

  4. A “Real” American Indian

    Kimberly R. Huyser considers the power of stereotypes and self-image as she participates in a project to create modern images of Native Americans.
  5. Socializing Economy

    Michael Lounsbury on Society and Economy: Framework and Principles.

  6. Commuter Spouses and the Changing American Family

    the rise of commuter marriage reflects decades of social change in women’s workplace participation, american individualism, technological saturation, bureaucratic hurdles, and the symbolic significance of marriage itself.

  7. How Environmental Decline Restructures Indigenous Gender Practices: What Happens to Karuk Masculinity When There Are No Fish?

    On the Klamath River in northern California, Karuk tribal fishermen traditionally provide salmon for food and ceremonies, yet the region has sustained serious environmental degradation in recent years. What happens to Karuk masculinity when there are no fish? Using interviews and public testimony, the authors examine how declining salmon runs affect the gender identities and practices of Karuk fishermen. Gendered practices associated with fishing serve ecological functions, perpetuate culture in the face of structural genocide, and unite families and communities.
  8. U.S. has 5 percent of world's population, but had 31 percent of its public mass shooters from 1966-2012

    Despite having only about 5 percent of the world's population, the United States was the attack site for a disproportionate 31 percent of public mass shooters globally from 1966-2012, according to research presented at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

  9. (Good) Debt is an Asset

    Raphael Charron-Chenier and Louise Seamster on debt and social inequality.
  10. Can Reducing Income Inequality Decouple Economic Growth from CO2 Emissions?

    In the past two decades, income inequality has steadily increased in most developed nations. During this same period, the growth rate of CO2 emissions has declined in many developed nations, cumulating to a recent period of decoupling between economic growth and CO2 emissions. The aim of the present study is to advance research on socioeconomic drivers of CO2 emissions by assessing how the distribution of income affects the relationship between economic growth and CO2 emissions.