American Sociological Association

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  1. ASA Files Amicus Brief With Supreme Court in Support of Marriage Equality

    The American Sociological Association (ASA) filed an amicus curiae brief yesterday with the Supreme Court of the United States in the same-sex marriage cases currently pending before the court. The ASA’s brief highlights the social science consensus that children raised by same-sex parents fare just as well as children raised by different-sex parents.

  2. Study Finds Foreclosures Fueled Racial Segregation in U.S.

    Some 9 million American families lost their homes to foreclosure during the late 2000s housing bust, driving many to economic ruin and in search of new residences. Hardest hit were black, Latino, and racially integrated neighborhoods, according to a new Cornell University analysis of the crisis.

    Led by demographer Matthew Hall, researchers estimate racial segregation grew between Latinos and whites by nearly 50 percent and between blacks and whites by about 20 percent as whites abandoned and minorities moved into areas most heavily distressed by foreclosures.

  3. Minorities' Homicide Victimization Rates Fall Significantly Compared to Whites'

    A new study reveals that while homicide victimization rates declined for whites, blacks, and Hispanics in the United States from 1990-2010, the drop was much more precipitous for the two minority groups.

  4. Sociologists Available to Discuss Same-Sex Marriage

    With the Supreme Court of the United States expected to rule imminently in the case of Obergefell v. Hodges, which addresses the matter of marriage equality and the constitutional status of state bans on same-sex marriage, the American Sociological Association (ASA) has a number of sociologists available to discuss same-sex marriage.

  5. U.S. Has 5 Percent of World's Population, But Had 31 Percent of its Public Mass Shooters From 1966-2012

    Despite having only about 5 percent of the world's population, the United States was the attack site for a disproportionate 31 percent of public mass shooters globally from 1966-2012, according to new research that will be presented at the 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

  6. Veterans Live in More Diverse Neighborhoods Than Their Civilian Counterparts of Same Race

    When members of the U.S. military leave the service, they tend to settle in neighborhoods with greater overall diversity than their civilian counterparts of the same race, according to a new study that will be presented at the 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

  7. Cultivating S-P-E-L-L-E-R-S

    Indian-American spellers are known for dominance on the national stage and even host regional, culturally specific bees. How did the niche emerge?

  8. Jishuku, Altruism, and Expatriate Emotion

    When a devastating earthquake and tsunami hit japan in 2011, the effects were felt by over a million expatriates worldwide.

  9. Immigration and Welfare Support in Germany

    In recent years, several international-comparative studies have analyzed the relationship between migration and native populations’ decreasing support for redistributive policies. However, these studies use cross-sectional designs and aggregate the number of foreign-born residents at the national level. Both aspects are theoretically and methodologically problematic. We address these shortcomings by investigating cross-sectional as well as longitudinal effects in the case of Germany, using a combination of individual- and regional-level data for several time points from 1994 to 2010.

  10. The Theory of Legal Cynicism and Sunni Insurgent Violence in Post-Invasion Iraq

    We elaborate a cultural framing theory of legal cynicism—previously used to account for neighborhood variation in Chicago homicides—to explain Arab Sunni victimization and insurgent attacks during the U.S. post-invasion occupation of Iraq. Legal cynicism theory has an unrecognized power to explain collective and interpersonal violence in international as well as U.S. settings. We expand on how "double and linked" roles of state and non-state actors can be used to analyze violence against Arab Sunni civilians.