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  1. Torture and Scientism

    Steven Ward on two reports revealing the insidious instrumentalism of a social science.

  2. Antwerp’s Appetite for African Hands

    Contexts, Volume 15, Issue 4, Page 65-67, Fall 2016.
  3. Muslim Punk in an Alt-Right Era

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 3, Page 63-65, Summer 2017.
  4. Religiosity and Muslim Women’s Employment in the United States

    Does Muslim women’s religiosity deter them from paid work outside the home? I extend this question to Muslims in the United States, where the Muslim community is both ethnically and socioeconomically diverse and where this question has not yet been answered. I pool data from the 2007 and 2011 Pew Research Center surveys of American Muslims, the only large, nationally representative samples of Muslims in the United States, and use logistic regression models to analyze the relationship between religiosity and Muslim women’s employment.
  5. Producing Sacredness and Defending Secularity: Faith in the Workplace of Taiwanese Scientists

    Although a recent body of scholarship focuses on how business professionals infuse spiritual practices in their workplaces, comparatively little attention has been paid to faith in the scientific workplace, especially in an Eastern, non-Christian context. Between 2014 and 2015, we conducted a survey of 892 scientists in Taiwan and completed interviews with 52 of our survey respondents. In this paper, we examine how scientists navigate religion in the scientific workplace.
  6. Alternately Contested: A Measurement Analysis of Alternately Worded Items in the National Science Foundation Science Literacy Scale

    Alternately worded versions of two controversial indicators of science knowledge were included in the 2012 wave of the General Social Survey. Using confirmatory factor analysis, the author tests whether these alternate items serve as better indicators of uncontested forms of science knowledge and finds that although more respondents give the “correct” response, they remain poor indicators of uncontested science knowledge.
  7. Religion among Scientists in International Context: A New Study of Scientists in Eight Regions

    Scientists have long been associated with religion’s decline around the world. But little data permit analysis of the religiosity of scientists or their perceptions of the science-faith interface.
  8. On the Weak Mortality Returns of the Prison Boom: Comparing Infant Mortality and Homicide in the Incarceration Ledger

    The justifications for the dramatic expansion of the prison population in recent decades have focused on public safety. Prior research on the efficacy of incarceration offers support for such claims, suggesting that increased incarceration saves lives by reducing the prevalence of homicide. We challenge this view by arguing that the effects of mass incarceration include collateral infant mortality consequences that call into question the number of lives saved through increased imprisonment.
  9. U.S. has 5 percent of world's population, but had 31 percent of its public mass shooters from 1966-2012

    Despite having only about 5 percent of the world's population, the United States was the attack site for a disproportionate 31 percent of public mass shooters globally from 1966-2012, according to research presented at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

  10. Review Essays: Four Perspectives on Contemporary American Judaism

    I begin this essay with a discussion of Uzi Rebhun’s book, Jews and the American Religious Landscape, because it offers an overview of the rich data on the demographics of Jews as of 2007. Also, this work provides us with a broad contextual understanding in which to situate the other books reviewed here. But Rebhun does not stop with an analysis of recent data. He goes further by comparing his findings to data from recent decades all the way back to the 1950s, a time when, for example, intermarriage was infrequent and it was understood that “marrying out” brought a great shame upon the family.