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  1. Review Essays: Inequality and Polarization in America

    Doug McAdam and Karina Kloos’s Deeply Divided: Racial Politics and Social Movements in Postwar America provides a powerful and timely analysis of the causes and consequences of growing political polarization and economic inequality. Arguing that social movements have contributed to a reconfiguration of politics, McAdam and Kloos show how the sharp right turn of the Republican Party has generated policies that greatly increase economic inequality.
  2. Agents with Principles: The Control of Labor in the Dutch East India Company, 1700 to 1796

    Agents with Principles: The Control of Labor in the Dutch East India Company, 1700 to 1796
  3. Whitewashing the Working Class

    Six essays consider the emotion, economic power, racial animus, alienation, anti-elitism, and exploitation of the “white working class”–and how it all fit into the 2016 election.

  4. Hope in the Sweatshops of Buenos Aires

    Dreaming and hustling in La Salada, Latin America’s largest low-cost garment marketplace.

  5. Walmart’s Consumer Redlining

    When Walmart opened its first two stores in Washington D.C. in late 2013, Mayor Vincent Gray said that the massive retailer would help to solve the problem of “food deserts” in the city.

  6. Ecometrics in the Age of Big Data: Measuring and Assessing "Broken Windows" Using Large-scale Administrative Records

    The collection of large-scale administrative records in electronic form by many cities provides a new opportunity for the measurement and longitudinal tracking of neighborhood characteristics, but one that will require novel methodologies that convert such data into research-relevant measures. The authors illustrate these challenges by developing measures of "broken windows" from Boston’s constituent relationship management (CRM) system (aka 311 hotline).

  7. Featured Essay: Why Sociologists Matter in the Welfare Reform Debate

    In the 1960s, public support for Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), a federal program that provided cash benefits to eligible poor families with children, began to erode (Teles 1996). Critics of welfare associated the growing number of unwed mothers with the rising rates of AFDC, even though the scientific evidence offered scant support for this claim.
  8. Seeing Like the Fed: Culture, Cognition, and Framing in the Failure to Anticipate the Financial Crisis of 2008

    Seeing Like the Fed: Culture, Cognition, and Framing in the Failure to Anticipate the Financial Crisis of 2008
  9. Third Generation Disadvantage among Mexican Americans

    Among Mexican Americans, generational differences in education do not fit with assimilation theory’s predictions of significant improvement from the second to third generation; instead, education for third generation remains similar to the second generation and falls behind that of non-Hispanic whites. Scholars have not examined this educational gap for recent cohorts, nor have they considered a wide range of economic outcomes by generation.
  10. Rich Friends, Poor Friends: Inter–Socioeconomic Status Friendships in Secondary School

    The author examines friendships between students from different socioeconomic groups, investigating the factors that make these relationships more likely and comparing these relationships with those between students from different races, which have been studied more extensively. Consistent with previous research, the results reveal that student homogeneity is positively related to social interaction in schools but that these relationships are not always straightforward with regard to socioeconomic status.