American Sociological Association

Search

Search

The search found 157 results in 0.023 seconds.

Search results

  1. Brashears and Simpson Will Edit Social Psychology Quarterly

    Dawn T. Robinson, University of Georgia

  2. 2018 ASA President Eduardo Bonilla-Silva

    by David G. Embrick, University of Connecticut

    Eduardo Bonilla-Silva, Professor of Sociology at Duke University, is more than a dedicated scholar. He is a mentor to many.

  3. Planning for Future Care and the End of Life: A Qualitative Analysis of Gay, Lesbian, and Heterosexual Couples

    Two key components of end-of-life planning are (1) informal discussions about future care and other end-of-life preferences and (2) formal planning via living wills and other legal documents. We leverage previous work on the institutional aspects of marriage and on sexual-minority discrimination to theorize why and how heterosexual, gay, and lesbian married couples engage in informal and formal end-of-life planning. We analyze qualitative dyadic in-depth interviews with 45 midlife gay, lesbian, and heterosexual married couples (N = 90 spouses).
  4. Film Review: Alive Inside: A Story of Music and Memory

    Population aging and its common health dynamics have become immensely important topics for student learning in the social and clinical sciences alike. Societies around the globe are shifting over to a more balanced distribution of older and younger members due to numerous shifts in health care, family planning, infrastructure development, and other phenomena. On average, populations around the world have gotten older as people have lived longer and reproduced less. Consequently, responding to aging both socially and clinically has been a top priority.
  5. Race-Ethnicity, Poverty, Urban Stressors, and Telomere Length in a Detroit Community-based Sample

    Residents of distressed urban areas suffer early aging-related disease and excess mortality. Using a community-based participatory research approach in a collaboration between social researchers and cellular biologists, we collected a unique data set of 239 black, white, or Mexican adults from a stratified, multistage probability sample of three Detroit neighborhoods. We drew venous blood and measured telomere length (TL), an indicator of stress-mediated biological aging, linking respondents’ TL to their community survey responses.

  6. Weiners Galore

    Contexts, Volume 15, Issue 4, Page 67-69, Fall 2016.
  7. The Deliberate Racism Making #Gaymediasowhite

    Once cloaked in non-descript brown wrappers and confined to back-alley magazine stores, gay media is now ubiquitous.

  8. How Movies with a Female Presence Fare with Critics

    This study explores one potential mechanism contributing to the persistent underrepresentation of women in film by considering whether movie critics reward or penalize films with an independent female presence. Drawing on a sample of widely distributed movies from 2000 to 2009 (n = 975), we test whether films that pass the Bechdel Test (two or more named women speak to each other about something other than a man) have higher or lower Metacritic scores net of control variables, including arthouse production label, genre, production budget, including a top star, and being a sequel.
  9. What Do We Rate When We Rate Our Health? Decomposing Age-related Contributions to Self-rated Health

    Self-ratings of health (SRH) indicate current health-related quality of life and independently predict mortality. Studies show the SRH of older adults appears less influenced by physical health than the SRH of younger adults. But if physical health accounts less for the SRH of older adults, what factors take its place? To understand the relative contributions of social, emotional, and physical states to SRH by age, we analyzed data from the National Health Interview Survey 2006 to 2011 (N = 153,341).
  10. Relationships: Cutting the Cord Is Easier Said Than Done

    Chances are, you have someone in your life who causes a lot of tension and stress. Difficult relationships are common. They are also commonly difficult to evade. Who are these people and why can't we just cut the cord?

    New research explores these questions and sheds light on the answers. Plain and simple: They are people you are stuck with, either because you need them or because you can't ignore them.