American Sociological Association

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  1. Pathways to Job Satisfaction: What Happened to the Class of 2005?

    This is the second in a series of research briefs to focus on the job outcomes of the 2005 sociology cohort. This brief describes a pathway from the sociological research skills learned as an undergraduate to the types of jobs obtained one and a half years after graduation and the effect on job satisfaction. 

  2. Sociology, Criminology Concentrations, and Criminal Justice: Differences in Reasons for Majoring, Skills, Activities, and Early Outcomes?

    Sociology departments have been concerned about losing potential majors for more vocationally-oriented programs, especially as the number of criminology and criminal justice majors has been increasing.  This research brief compares the ways in which students’ perceptions and experiences differ among three types of majors and examines the potential benefits and challenges that various departmental arrangements pose.

  3. Recent Sociology Alumni: Would They Major Again?

    Choosing a college major usually comes down to the future careers options that are available in that field. Sociology is not typically associated with a direct career path, however, this research brief demonstrates that many sociology graduates are satisfied with what the major provides them post-graduation.

  4. Social Capital for Sociology Majors: Applied Activities and Peer Networks

    Building social capital through activities outside the classroom can help students find jobs after graduation. This research brief examines how sociology departments create opportunities for their majors to build social capital through activities such as internships and career fairs, and the level of participation amongst students. 

  5. Sociology Majors: Before Graduation in 2012

    Due in part to the recent recession, the 2012 cohort of senior sociology majors faced a tighter job market and increasing levels of debt. The findings presented in this brief compare the backgrounds, experiences, concepts and skills mastered, levels of satisfaction, and future plans and sources of job information of students at three types of institutions.

  6. IDEALISTS VS. CAREERISTS: Graduate School Choices of Sociology Majors

    The focus of this research brief is on those 2005 sociology gradates who continued on to graduate school directly after graduation. This brief explores how the sociology major is useful for graduate study in both applied programs as well as the liberal arts and sciences.

  7. ASA Style Guide, 5th Edition

    The fifth edition of the ASA Style Guide is the authoritative reference for writing, submitting, editing, and copyediting manuscripts for ASA journals and other publications following ASA's unique format. This revised, expanded edition features guidelines for the most common situations encountered by authors and editors. New features include revisions to reference formatting and additional information on grammar. In addition, updated reference examples, including citing social media sources and journal articles posted online ahead of print, are included in this new edition.

  8. 2020 Guide to Graduate Departments of Sociology

    A best seller for many years, this invaluable reference has been published by the ASA since 1965 and provides comprehensive information for academic administrators, advisers, faculty, students, and a host of others seeking information on social science departments in the U.S., Canada, and abroad.