American Sociological Association

Search

Search

The search found 8 results in 0.028 seconds.

Search results

  1. Study Explores Reasons Behind Alcohol Abuse in Non-Heterosexual Women

    Non-heterosexual women who feel a disconnect between who they are attracted to and how they identify themselves may have a higher risk of alcohol abuse, according to a new study led by Amelia E. Talley, an assistant professor in Texas Tech University's Department of Psychological Sciences.

  2. Polygamy and Alcohol Linked to Physical Abuse in African Marriages

    African women in polygamous marriages or with alcoholic husbands have a significantly higher risk of being physically abused by their husbands than women in monogamous marriages or women whose husbands don't abuse alcohol, new research shows.

  3. Women More Likely Than Men to Initiate Divorces, But Not Non-Marital Breakups

    Women are more likely than men to initiate divorces, but women and men are just as likely to end non-marital relationships, according to a new study that will be presented at the 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

  4. Bartending and Family Life Might Not Mix, Study Says

    If you want to mix drinks for a living, don’t expect to have a typical family life.

    That was the conclusion of a study by Tulane University sociologists Emily Starr and Alicia McCraw, who interviewed 40 New Orleans area bartenders for their study, “Barkeeps and Barmaids on the White Picket Fence: Bartenders, Gender, and Performative Adulthood,” which they presented at the 111th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

  5. Study Uses Geo-Mapping to Identify ‘Hot Spots’ for Use of Fentanyl and Other Opiates

    As the U.S. experiences sharp increases in drug overdoses, researchers in Delaware are using geo-mapping to look at the state, neighborhood by neighborhood, to identify “hot spots” where the use of prescription fentanyl — an extremely powerful synthetic opiate, which recently attracted national attention as the drug that caused Prince’s death — and other opiates is especially prevalent. 

  6. Contexts: Science in Society

    Fall 2015 Vol. 14 No. 4

    The social and political entanglements of science, from climate change and medical marijuana to the origins of modern American sociology.

  7. Relationships: Cutting the Cord Is Easier Said Than Done

    Chances are, you have someone in your life who causes a lot of tension and stress. Difficult relationships are common. They are also commonly difficult to evade. Who are these people and why can't we just cut the cord?

    New research explores these questions and sheds light on the answers. Plain and simple: They are people you are stuck with, either because you need them or because you can't ignore them.

  8. Contexts: Loving and Leaving

    Contexts
    Fall 2017 Vol. 16 No. 4

    Feature articles include "Virginia is for Lovers", "Marijuana’s Moral Entrepreneurs, Then and Now", "Commuter Spouses and the Changing American Family", "The Queer Work of Militarized Prides", "Accountability after Genocide", and "Race, Class, and the Framing of Drug Epidemics."