American Sociological Association

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  1. ASA Files Amicus Brief With Supreme Court in Support of Marriage Equality

    The American Sociological Association (ASA) filed an amicus curiae brief yesterday with the Supreme Court of the United States in the same-sex marriage cases currently pending before the court. The ASA’s brief highlights the social science consensus that children raised by same-sex parents fare just as well as children raised by different-sex parents.

  2. More Than Half of 'Children' Misperceive or Reject Parents' Political Party Affiliations

    A new study finds that more than half of all "children" in the U.S. either misperceive or reject their parents' political party affiliations.

  3. Keep Your Enemies Close? Study Finds Greater Proximity to Opponents Leads to More Polarization

    Encouraging adversaries to have more interpersonal contact to find common ground may work on occasion, but not necessarily in the U.S. Senate, according to new research.

  4. Pressure to 'Publish or Perish' May Discourage Innovative Research, Study Suggests

    The traditional pressure in academia for faculty to "publish or perish" advances knowledge in established areas. But it also might discourage scientists from asking the innovative questions that are most likely to lead to the biggest breakthroughs, according to a new study spearheaded by a UCLA professor.

  5. Sociologists Available to Discuss Same-Sex Marriage

    With the Supreme Court of the United States expected to rule imminently in the case of Obergefell v. Hodges, which addresses the matter of marriage equality and the constitutional status of state bans on same-sex marriage, the American Sociological Association (ASA) has a number of sociologists available to discuss same-sex marriage.

  6. Unmarried Women: Politically Cohesive, More Concerned About Women's Status Than Married Counterparts

    Why do unmarried women tend to be more liberal and Democratic than their married counterparts? A key reason is because unmarried women — those who have never been married and those who are divorced — are more concerned about the status of women as a collective group, suggests a new study that will be presented at the 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA). 

  7. Study Explores Why There Is No Labor Party in the United States

    The improbable rise of Bernie Sanders' presidential campaign presents an interesting question: why is Sanders, a self-proclaimed "democratic socialist," running as a Democrat? "In any other industrialized country, Sanders would likely be the standard-bearer for a labor or social democratic party," said McGill University sociologist Barry Eidlin, whose new study appears in the June issue of the American Sociological Review. "But the U.S. famously lacks such a party."

  8. Early Behavior Problems Impact Long-Term Educational Attainment More for Boys than Girls

    A new study finds that behavioral problems in early childhood have a larger negative effect on high school and college completion rates for boys than girls, which partially explains the substantial gender gap in educational attainment that currently exists in the United States.

  9. Study Finds Couples’ Division of Paid and Unpaid Labor Linked to Risk of Divorce

    A new study suggests that financial factors, including couples’ overall resources and wives’ ability to support themselves in the event of a divorce, are not predictive of whether marriages last. Rather, it is couples’ division of labor — paid and unpaid — that is associated with the risk of divorce.