American Sociological Association

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  1. 2015 Editorial Table

    In August 2015, the ASA Committee on Publications voted to modify the summary table accompanying annual ASA editors’ reports to provide better information about the frequency and timing of editorial decisions.  The goal is to clarify authors' chances of having manuscripts accepted, and to provide information about the length of time authors can expect to wait for decisions. The table shown below reports on decisions, as of March 1, 2016, for manuscripts submitted in the 2015 calendar year.

  2. ASA Awards Small Grants to Advance Sociology

    The Fund for the Advancement of the Discipline (FAD) is a small grants program funded jointly by the Sociology Program of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the American Sociological Association (ASA). The December 2015 round of FAD applications saw an unusually strong group of proposals, so the competition was especially intense. Following review by a panel composed of members of the ASA Council and ASA Director of Research, seven projects have been selected for funding and are described below.

  3. Richard Carpiano and Brian Kelly to Lead JHSB

    The editorship of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior (JHSB), the ASA’s premier general medical sociology journal, will transition at the end of this year from Gilbert Gee to Richard Carpiano and Brian Kelly.

  4. MFP Announces Cohort 43 for the 2016-2017 Academic Year

    ASA and the Minority Fellowship Program (MFP) are pleased to introduce the five new scholars who comprise MFP Cohort 43. The MFP Advisory Panel met this spring in Washington, DC, to review the large and highly competitive pool of applications. Keeping with tradition, MFP Cohort 43 consists of talented PhD candidates with strong and diverse sociological research interests. The new Fellows will officially begin their participation in MFP on August 1, 2016. 

  5. Sociologists Elected to the National Academy of Sciences

    In May, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) announced the election of two sociologists—Andrew Cherlin and Eileen Crimmins—among this year’s 84 new members. These newly elected NAS members were recognized for their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. Members in the Academy, considered one of the highest honors in American science, help write reports on key scientific issues to help inform policymakers’ decisions.

  6. Sections Collaborate to Explore Disability as an Overlooked Axis of Intersectionality and Inequality

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, approximately 19 percent of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States lives with disability. As baby boomers age and live longer, the percentage continues to increase and is already larger than that of many of the racial and ethnic groups that we as sociologists intensively study. Yet, disability has often been overlooked in scholarship on inequality and intersectionality.

  7. On the Value of Diversity in Higher Education

    On April 22, 2016, the Tennessee legislature voted to cut all state appropriations for the Office of Equity and Diversity at the state’s flagship university. This move came as a blow to a university struggling to create a more welcoming gender, religious, and racial environment for students, faculty, and staff in Central Appalachia—a region with a long history of intolerance. Since the April decision, students, faculty, and staff at the University of Tennessee have repeatedly rallied in protest.