American Sociological Association

Courses

All Courses are held on Friday, August 9. Registration is required and seats are limited. If you have already registered for the Annual Meeting and would like to add a course, return to the ASA membership portal, log in, and select 2019 Annual Meeting Registration in the Annual Meeting section.

SOLD OUT - We’ve Got the Numbers! Finding Census Data, Constructing Tables, and Creating Maps
1:00 - 4:30 p.m.
Registration Fee: $10

This course shows how to get Census (ACS) data, construct tables, and create maps. The workshop is divided into 3 parts: (1) A description of the differences between the 10-year Census and American Community Survey, and how those surveys are conducted, along with a look at some of the questions. (2). We dive into the American Factfinder portal and show how to find statistics, and how to create tables, and download the information. We urge attendees to follow along on their devices. (3) An explanation of cartographic technique for statistics is presented, and then the mapping tool in American Factfinder will be presented, and attendees will be given a topic to map themselves. Data items available through the Census Bureau that pertain to social justice issues include : lack of health insurance; no reliable plumbing; no internet accessibility; areas with high SNAP, etc.

#MeToo: Empowerment Self-Defense for LGBTQ+TGNC Members
3:00 - 5:00 p.m.
Registration Fee: $0

Discussions cover strategies for safety and prevention of sexual assault and domestic violence, emotional aspects of self-defense, healthy and unhealthy relationships, and concrete steps we can take to help ourselves, our families, and our communities be more safe. Role plays allow participants to practice asserting themselves; taking care of themselves and setting clear boundaries with acquaintances, strangers, and family members; and building powerful voices. Basic self-defense strategies include a full spectrum of responses, including the following: avoiding danger, yelling, getting away, tricking someone, defending with physical techniques, and seeking help afterwards.

SOLD OUT - #MeToo: Empowerment Self-Defense
3:00 - 5:00 p.m.
Registration Fee: $0

Discussions cover strategies for safety and prevention of sexual assault and domestic violence, emotional aspects of self-defense, healthy and unhealthy relationships, and concrete steps we can take to help ourselves, our families, and our communities be more safe. Role plays allow participants to practice asserting themselves; taking care of themselves and setting clear boundaries with acquaintances, strangers, and family members; and building powerful voices. Basic self-defense strategies include a full spectrum of responses, including the following: avoiding danger, yelling, getting away, tricking someone, defending with physical techniques, and seeking help afterwards.

Undocumented on Campus: Building Bridges for Social Justice
1:00 - 5:00 p.m.
Registration Fee: $22

Undocumented students are on every college and university campus nationwide. What’s their experience? How do undocumented students and their families connect with colleges and universities? How can we as sociologists crack the structures of power on our campuses and in our states to ensure the dignity and respect of undocumented students? The goal of this course is to grow public sociology by bridging academics with local DREAM activists, and to formulate progressive ends on college campuses.
 
This multi-part course will include an opening address by sociologist Roberto Gonzales (Harvard Professor and author of “Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America” (2015) UC Press). Second, students and activists from Connecticut Students 4 a Dream (C4D) will give an up-close look at undocumented lives, including personal testimonies and more (C4D is a statewide youth led organization that works for the rights of undocumented students and their families through community organizing, advocacy, and youth development). Next, we will examine the current immigration system that creates barriers for undocumented youth to achieve success. Then we will explore examples of how colleges and universities nationwide have begun to embrace undocumented students through empowerment, and by creating atmospheres of inclusion. Finally, in breakout sessions, participants will be passed the baton and connect, build, and plan. Each segment of the course will include ample time for discussion, contributions, and collaboration.

Supporters

2019 Pearson
2019 Fordham University
2019 Hofstra