September/October 2015 Issue • Volume 43 • Issue 6

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Announcements

Related Links:

Call for Papers

Publications

Gender and Food: From Production to Consumption and After, edited by Marcia Texler Segal and Vasilikie Demos, is looking for papers exploring the relationship between gender and food as evidenced globally, societally, and locally with respect to the full range of issues associated with production, consumption and the effects of both. Deadline: January 15, 2016. Contact: Danielle Lavin Louks at danielle.lavin-louks@valpo.edu.

Social Class in Education, a series edited by Buffy Smith and Victoria Svoboda and published by Rowman, is seeking paper submissions from sociologists focused on Pre-K through post-secondary school environments, as well as manuscripts that explore intersections of classism and other forms of identities and oppressions. While education is often heralded as a means of social mobility, educational outcomes suggest that schools, colleges, and universities actually replicate rather than transform social class inequities. Deadline: November 1, 2015. Contact: Buffy Smith at bsmith@stthomas.edu; Victoria Svoboba at tsvoboda@uwlax.edu  or Nicolette Amstutz at namstutz@rowman.edu.

Religions announces a special issue on glodal religions. Glodal religions involve the blending or fusion of global religious expression with local particularity. Contributions from all religious traditions are welcome. The theme of global religion has been in circulation under a variety of labels (syncretism, hybridity). Deadline: October 15, 2015. For more information, visit www.mdpi.com/journal/religions/special_issues/glocal_religions.

Research in the Sociology of Health Care seeks papers for its research annual: “Issues in Health and Healthcare for Special Groups, Social Factors, and Disparities.” Papers dealing with macro-level system issues and micro-level issues involving special groups, social factors, and disparities linked to issues in health and health care are sought. Papers that focus on linkages to policy, population concerns, and either patients or providers of care as ways to meet health care needs of people both in the U.S. and in other countries are solicited. Deadline: November 15, 2015. Contact: Jennie Jacobs Kronenfeld at Sociology Program, Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics, Box 873701, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-3701; (480) 965-8053; jennie.kronenfeld@asu.edu.

Research in the Sociology of Work (RSW), a widely respected research annual since 1988, invites submissions to be included in RSW volume 28, no. 2 (Fall, 2016). Beginning in 2016, RSW will appear twice annually to better represent the best and most provocative sociological thinking being done on work, organization, and employment relationship. Deadline: November 1, 2015. Contact: Steven Vallas at s.vallas@neu.edu.

Social Class in Education, a series edited by Buffy Smith and Victoria Svoboda and published by Rowman, is seeking paper submissions from sociologists focused on Pre-K through post-secondary school environments, as well as manuscripts that explore intersections of classism and other forms of identities and oppressions. While education is often heralded as a means of social mobility, educational outcomes suggest that schools, colleges, and universities actually replicate rather than transform social class inequities. Deadline: November 1, 2015. Contact: Buffy Smith at bsmith@stthomas.edu; Victoria Svoboba at tsvoboda@uwlax.edu; or Nicolette Amstutz at namstutz@rowman.edu 

Conferences

European Association for Population Studies, August 31-September 3, 2016, Mainz, Germany. Theme: “Demographic Change and Policy Implications.” The conference is carried out by the European Association for Population Studies (EAPS) in cooperation with the Federal Institute for Population Research. The EPC2016 is a general scientific population conference where the theme will receive special attention. Submissions should be made to one of the conference themes, which will be developed into a series of sessions by the convener of each theme. Authors will be informed about acceptance of their submission by early March 2016. Deadline: December 15, 2015. For more information, visit www.epc2016.princeton.edu.

Mid-America American Studies Association 2016 Conference (MAASA), March 4-5, 2016, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS. Theme: “Defining Who and What Matters in the U.S. and Beyond.” MAASA welcomes papers, proposed panels, roundtables, poster sessions, and other session formats from students, faculty, and activists. The major issues of the 21st century are being fought in the backyards of the Midwest, the geographical U.S. center.  The Midwest has become the political battleground for policies, rhetoric, and practices that are shifting definitions of who and what matters in the US and beyond. These trends indicate the direction of our humanity. Deadline: November 1, 2015. For more information, visit www.americanstudies.ku.edu/call-papers-and-sessions.

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Meetings

October 8-10, 2015. Association for Applied & Clinical Sociology (AACS) 2015 Annual Conference, Montgomery, AL. Theme: “Social Justice from the Local to the Global: Sociology on the Move.” Contact: Karen Albright at AACSsubmission@gmail.com. For more information, visit www.aacsnet.net/conference/2014-call-papers/.

October 12-15, 2015. 2015 World Conference on North Korean Studies (WCNKS), Seoul, Korea. The objectives of the WCNKS are to encourage experts who study North Korea in various academic fields such as politics, economics, investment, health, women’s rights, culture, arts, history, science, and technology, and communication. Contact: wcnks.open@gmail.com.

October 21-25, 2015. Association for Humanist Sociology’s 2015 Annual Meetings, Portland, OR. Theme: “Locavore Sociology: Challenging Globalization, Embracing the Local.”  Contact: Kathleen J. Fitzgerald at fitzy88so@gmail.com.

November 9, 2015. UK Ethics Conference, Brighton, United Kingdom. Theme: “Have We Become too Ethical?” One concern is when is ethics review too constrictive and when is it too permissive? The aim of this conference is to formulate the basis for feasible, fair, and effective ethical review at home and in transnational collaborative research. For more information, visit www.centreforbionetworking.org.

November 23-26, 2015. The Australian Sociological Association (TASA), Cairns, Far North Queensland, Australia. Theme: “Neoliberalism and Contemporary Challenges for the Asia-Pacific.” For more information, visit www.conference.tasa.org.au.

December 14-15, 2015. Science of Dissemination and Implementation 8th Annual Conference, Washington, DC. Theme: “Optimizing Personal and Population Health.” For more information, visit www.diconference.academyhealth.org/callforabstracts/cfa.

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Funding

American Academy in Berlin invites applications for its residential fellowships for the 2016-17 academic year. The Academy welcomes applications from sociologists who wish to engage in independent study in Berlin. Twenty Berlin Prizes are conferred annually. Fellowships are typically awarded for an academic semester or, on occasion, for an entire academic year. Bosch Fellowships in Public Policy may be awarded for shorter stays of six to eight weeks. Benefits include round-trip airfare, partial board, a $5,000 monthly stipend, and accommodations at the Academy’s lakeside Hans Arnhold Center in the Berlin-Wannsee district. Deadline: September 20, 2015. For more information, visit www.americanacademy.de/home/fellows/applications.

Berlin Program for Advanced German and European Studies offers up to one year of research support at the Freie Universität Berlin.  The program accepts applications from U.S. and Canadian nationals, permanent and long-term residents. Applicants for a dissertation fellowship must be full-time graduate students enrolled at a North American university who have achieved ABD status by the time the proposed research stay in Berlin begins. Also eligible are U.S. and Canadian PhD’s who have received their doctorates within the past two calendar years.  Deadline: December 1, 2015. For more information, visit www.fu-berlin.de/bprogram or send an email to bprogram@zedat.fu-berlin.de.

National Science Foundation Discovery Research PreK-12 program (DRK-12) seeks to significantly enhance learning and teaching of STEM by Prek-12 students and teachers through research and development of STEM education. Projects should result in research-informed and field-tested outcomes and products that inform teaching and learning. Teachers and students who participate in DRK-12 studies are expected to enhance their understanding and use of STEM content, practices and skills. Anticipated Funding Amount: $50 million. Deadline: December 7, 2015. For more information, visit www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15592/nsf15592.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click.

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Fellowships

American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Fellowships are intended as salary replacement to help scholars devote six to twelve continuous months to full-time research and writing. ACLS Fellowships are portable and are tenable at the fellow’s home institution, abroad, or at another appropriate site for research. An ACLS Fellowship may be held concurrently with other fellowships and grants and any sabbatical pay, up to an amount equal to the candidate’s current academic year salary. Tenure of the fellowship may begin no earlier than July 1, 2016, and no later than February 1, 2017. Deadline: September 23, 2015. For more information, visit www.acls.org/programs/acls/.

American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Collaborative Research Fellowships The aim of this fellowship program is to offer small teams of two or more scholars the opportunity to collaborate intensively on a single, substantive project. The fellowship supports projects that produce a tangible research product (such as joint print or web publications) for which two or more collaborators will take credit. The fellowships are for up to 24 months, to be initiated between July 1, 2016 and September 1, 2018. Deadline: September 23, 2015. For more information, visit www.acls.org/programs/collaborative/.

American Philosophical Society (APS) is offering one to two fellowships for the 2015-16 academic year. The first one is in collaboration with the British Academy: an exchange postdoctoral fellowship in the archives and libraries of London during 2016. This award includes travel expenses between the U.S. and UK and a monthly subsistence paid by the APS. The second one is in collaboration with the Institute for Advanced Studies in Humanities (IASH) at the University of Edinburgh. Available to scholars of postdoctoral or equivalent standing, includes travel, private office, library, research facilities at the IASH, and a monthly subsistence paid by the APS. Deadline: October 1, 2015. Contact: Linda Musumeci at LMusumeci@amphilsoc.org. For more information, visit www.amphilsoc.org.

Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (CASBS) at Stanford University is now accepting applications for residential fellowships for the 2016-17 academic year. CASBS has hosted generations of scholars and scientists who come for a year as fellows. The CASBS fellowship provides an excellent opportunity for scholars to pursue innovative research and expand their horizons while engaging in a diverse, interdisciplinary community. Deadline: November 6, 2015. For more information, visit www.casbs.org/individual-residential-fellowships.

National Humanities Center invites applications for academic-year or one-semester residencies. Fellowship applicants must have a PhD or equivalent scholarly credentials. Mid-career as well as senior scholars from all areas of the humanities are welcome; emerging scholars with a strong record of peer-reviewed work are also encouraged to apply. Located in the progressive Triangle region of North Carolina, the Center affords access to the rich cultural and intellectual communities supported by the area’s research institutes and universities. Fellows have private studies; the library service delivers all research materials. Scholars from all parts of the globe are eligible; travel expenses, in addition to a stipend, are provided. Deadline: October 15, 2015. For more information, visit www.nationalhumanitiescenter.org/fellowships/fellowships2016.html.

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Competitions

2017 Catharine Stimpson Prize for Outstanding Feminist Scholarship from the University of Chicago Press and Signs. Named in honor of the founding editor of Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, the Catharine Stimpson Prize is designed to recognize excellence and innovation in the work of emerging feminist scholars. The prize is awarded biennially to the best paper in an international competition. The prize-winning paper will be published in Signs, and the author will be provided an honorarium of $1,000. All papers submitted for the Stimpson Prize will be considered for peer review and possible publication in Signs. Deadline: March 1, 2016. For more information, visit www.signsjournal.org/cfps.

Peter K. New Student Research Annual Competition from the Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA). The Competition invites papers (maximum of 45 pages) based on original research in the general area of health or human services (broadly interpreted) from students at the graduate or undergraduate level. The Competition winner will receive $3,000 as well as an engraved Baccarat trophy. Travel funds will also be provided for the winner to present the paper at the SfAA Meeting in Vancouver, BC Canada in March 2016.  Second and third prizes will be awarded depending on the quality of the competition. Deadline: December 31, 2015. Contact: (405) 843-5113; info@sfaa.net. For more information, visit www.sfaa.net.

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In The News

Richard Alba, CUNY-Graduate Center, wrote a June 11 New York Times op ed, “The Myth of a White Minority.”

Karl Alexander, Johns Hopkins University, was mentioned in a June 17 Baltimore Sun article, “A Hopkins Sociologist Busts an American Belief: Study of 800 Baltimoreans Found Those Born Poor Stayed Poor.”

Margaret Archer, University of Warwick, was mentioned in a July 21 Crux article, “World Mayors Vow to Fight Climate Change, Human Slavery.”

Elizabeth Armstrong, University of Michigan, was quoted in a June 16 Washington Post article, “The Best Things Parents Can Do to Help Prevent Sexual Assault? Talk About It.”

Sandra L. Barnes, Vanderbilt University, wrote an essay, “Emanuel AME has Long Been a Target for Hate - As Well as Place of Hope,” for The Conversation (June 26). She was quoted in a June 19 Washington Post article, “How the African American Church Became a Social Step Ladder” and in a June 20 FiveThirtyEight article, “The Charleston Shooter Struck The Heart of the African-American South.” Barnes was interviewed about the Charleston murders on June 23 on the Channel 5 Plus Network MorningLine with Nick Beres show, titled “Black Churches and White Supremacists.” She was also interviewed on June 30 about the historic and contemporary Black Church on the Channel 5 Plus Network Urban Outlook with April Eaton show entitled, “The Black Church” as well as on racial identity (“Rachel Dolezal and Racial Identity”) in another segment of that same show.

Jessica Barron, Duke University, was quoted in a June 24 Guardian article, “Racism is Alive in the U.S. North Too – Just without Southern Accents and Flags.”

Bianca Bersani, University of Massachusetts-Boston, was quoted in a July 27 New Yorker article, “American Limbo,” on crime and immigrants.

Amy Blackstone, University of Maine, was quoted in a June 5 Pacific Standard article, “Can a New Parent Remain a Good Friend?”

Joseph Blasi, Rutgers University, was mentioned in a July 22 Washington Post article, “The Trouble with Hillary Clinton’s Profit-Sharing Plan.”

Kathleen M.  Blee, University of Pittsburgh, was quoted in a June 24 National Post article, “How White Supremacist Groups Have Used the Deaths of Trayvon Martin and Other Black Men to Grow their Ranks.”

Camille Zubrinsky Charles, University of Pennsylvania, was quoted in a June 15 Wall Street Journal article, “Rachel Dolezal Resigns as Head of Spokane NAACP Chapter and in a June 14 South Bend Tribune article, “Controversial NAACP Leader to Talk Monday.”

Andrew Cherlin, Johns Hopkins University, was quoted in a July 23 New Republic article, “The New Nuclear Family.”

Carolyn Chernoff, Skidmore College, was quoted in a July 27 the Nation article, “Minaj Shows Black Women’s Challenges,” on race and body image in pop music.

Noelle Chesley, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, was mentioned in a May 5 Huffington Post article, “Only 6 American Men Identified as Stay-At-Home Dads in the 1970s. Today, It’s A Different Story,” and in a May 13 Huffington Post article, “The States with The Most Stay-At-Home Fathers.”

Philip Cohen, University of Maryland, was quoted in a June 8 Pacific Standard article, “How Women Provide an ‘Invisible Subsidy’ to the World’s Health Care Systems.”

Scott Coltrane, University of California-Riverside, was mentioned in a June 18 Boston Globe article, “The Changing Role of Fathers: Fathers More Involved in Child Care Become Better Parents — and that’s Good for the Whole Family.”

Cheryl Cooky, Purdue University, was mentioned in a June 9 Phys.org article, “Attitudes about Women’s Sports in Mainstream Media.”

Marianne Cooper, Stanford University, was quoted in a March 27 CNet article, “Juror Kerfuffle Leads to High Drama in Ellen Pao Discrimination Trial.”

Marianne Cooper, Stanford University, Jennifer Silva, Bucknell University and Lane Kenworthy, University of California-San Diego, were quoted in a February 15 Washington Examiner article, “The Mighty but Elusive Middle Class.”

Sarah Damaske, Pennsylvania State University, was mentioned in a June 15 CNN article, “Kids of Working Moms Are Better Off.”

William D’Antonio, Catholic University, was quoted in a June 16 SunHerald article, “Pope’s Stern Climate Encyclical Faces Deep Political Divides.”

Jenny Davis, James Madison University, was quoted in a July 28 Washington Post article, “Beme Wants to Be the App for Social Media ‘Authenticity.’ Too Bad There’s No Such Thing.”

William Davies, University of Warwick, was featured in a June 5 New York Magazine Q&A article, “Your Boss Wants You to be Happier. This is Not a Good Thing.”

Thomas Dietz and Kenneth Frank, Michigan State University, were mentioned in a June 15 Los Angeles Times article, “Do a State’s Politics Influence its Greenhouse Gas Emissions? Yes, Study Says.”

Kathryn Edin, Johns Hopkins University, was quoted in a June 15 Time magazine article, “How Deadbeat are Deadbeat Dads, Really?”

Joe Feagin, Texas A&M University, was featured in a July 27 New York Times Q&A article, “American Racism in the ‘White Frame.’ ”

Dana Fisher, University of Maryland, was quoted in an April 26 Baltimore Sun article, “Sociologist Says Mood from Protest Can Change from Block to Block.”

Charles Gallagher, La Salle University, was quoted in a July 19, CNN Politics article, “Obama, You’re Still No Regan.”He was also quoted with G. Reginald Daniel, University of California-Santa Barbara, in a June 17 Yahoo News article, “Controversial US Activist:  ‘I Definitely Am Not White.’ ”

Roberto Gonzales, Harvard University, was mentioned in a June 17 Phoenix New Times article, “DREAMers Celebrate DACA’s Three-Year Anniversary—With Reservations.”

Kieran Healy, Duke University, was quoted in a July 24 Washington Post article, “11 Essential Facts About Guns and Mass Shootings in America.”

William Helmreich, CUNY-City College of New York, was mentioned in a July 29 New Yorker article, “The City So Nice They Walked It Twice.”

Carole Joffe, University of California-San Francisco, was quoted in a June 7 Associated Press article, “Number of Abortions Drops in Montana,” which appeared in a June 7 Washington Times article and a June 8 NBC Right No feature.

Dustin Kidd, Temple University, was quoted in a June 18 LA Times article, “‘How Did We Let This Happen? The Amy Winehouse Question and Social Science’s Take on Modern Fame.”

Peter Kivisto, Augustana College, was interviewed by Francesco Cargnelutti on immigration in Europe today, with a focus on the impact of anti-Muslim attitudes, specifically the claims that the continent is experiencing an “invasion.” The article appeared in Corriere del Trentino on May 27.

Rebecca Chiyoko King- O’Riain, National University of Ireland Maynooth, was quoted in a June 6 Newsweek article, “A Half Black Japanese Beauty Queen Is Raising Eyebrows- But Will She Change Minds?”

Eric Klinenburg, New York University, was mentioned in a June 24 USA Today article, “Readers Fall for Aziz Ansari’s ‘Modern Romance,’”  about his book Modern Romance, co-authored with comedian, Aziz Ansari. His collaboration on the book was also covered in the Guardian on June 7, The New York Times June 13, The National Post on June 30, Bustle on July 22, the International Business Times on July 1 and the Chicago Reader and Time on July 13, among many other media outlets. He also wrote a July 2 Slate article, “The Heat Is On: Climate Change Will Make Deadly Heat Waves like Pakistan’s and Europe’s Worse Than Ever.”

Maria Krysan, University of Illinois-Chicago, and Michael Bader, American University, were quoted in a July 17 Washington Post article, “How Race Still Influences Where We Choose to Live.”

Arielle Kuperberg, University of North Carolina-Greensboro, was quoted in a June 9 Today article, “Never Married, Living Alone, Number of Young Singles ‘Dramatically’ Rises.”

Jennifer Laird, University of Washington, was quoted in a June 24 Huffington Post article, “What’s Happening to America’s Black Working Class?”

Jennifer Lee, University of California-Irvine, wrote a June 16 Houston Chronicle article, “Asian Americans and the ‘Bamboo Ceiling,’” was quoted in a July 28 Daily News article, “Friend’s Account about Canadian Woman Convicted of Hiring Hit on Asian Immigrant Parents Reveals Life of Stress, Rebellion,” and was mentioned in a July 8 Boston Globe article, “Complaint Alleging Harvard Bias against Asians Dismissed.”

R. L’Heureux Lewis-McCoy, CUNY-City College of New York, was interviewed for a June 19 Huffington Post article, “A Sociologist Explains the Charleston Church Shooting and Racism in the U.S.”

Daniel Lichter, Cornell University, was quoted in a July 30 Atlantic article, “White Flight Never Ended.”

Kris Marsh, University of Maryland, was quoted in a July 17 Voice of America article, “Racism in U.S. Harder to Spot, Even Harder to Combat.”

Gustavo Mesch, University of Haifa, and Kent Schwirian, Ohio State University, were mentioned in a February 6 New York Times article, “Debate Over Vaccine Requirements Forge Strange Alliance,” a February 3 Huffington Post article, “Anti-Vaccination Advocates Don’t Trust the Government, Study Finds,” and a February 5 Economist article, “Politics and Vaccination: What Experts Say and What People Hear.”

Ann Morning, New York University, provided insight into the Rachel Dolezal case on June 16 on MSNBC Politics Nation and on June 17 on Good Morning America. She was also interviewed by the BBC, CBS Evening News, CBS Local News, ABC Eyewitness News, ARISE TV and KPCC radio. In mid-June she gave interviews on U.S. Census racial classification that appeared in The Washington Post, Time, and the Pew Research Center Fact Tank.

Guðmundur Oddsson, Northern Michigan University, was quoted in a July 8 The Independent article, “Norway’s Police Only Fired Two Bullets Last Year...and No One Was Killed.” He was also quoted with Paul Hirschfield, Rutgers University, in a July 30 Business Insider article, “American Police Kill More People in One Day than Norwegian Cops have in 10 Years.”

Andrew Papachristos, Yale University, was mentioned in a July 22 Rolling Stones article, “Inside Chicago’s Endless Cycle of Gun Violence.” He was quoted in The Chicago Sun on June 27, The Wall Street Journal on July 6, New York Times on July 9, and The Digital Journal on July 11.

David Pedulla, University of Texas-Austin, was quoted in a July 31 Today article, “Can Modern Dads Have it All? Work Realities Clash with Millennial Men’s Ideals” and in a July 30 New York Times article, “Millenial Men Aren’t the Dads They Thought They’d Be.”  He also discussed his research in a July 31 segment of the Today show. The news coverage was on his research in the February American Sociological Review.

David Pettinicchio, University of Toronto, wrote a July 19 USA Today article, “How to Aid the ADA: Column,” which discussed his work with Michele Maroto, University of Alberta.

Craig Reinarman, University of California-Santa Cruz, was quoted in an April 22, Foreign Policy article, “Feds Gone Wild: Why Federal Agents Act So Badly.” He was also interviewed about the U.S. movement for cannabis legalization in a March 15 article in Tiimi, a Finnish magazine for alcohol and drug professionals. His was also featured in a May 15 article in PopNAD: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

Lauren Rivera, Northwestern University, was mentioned in a June 15 Guardian article, “The Guardian View on Social Mobility: No Room at the Top.”

John P. Robinson, University of Maryland, was quoted in a June 24 Wall Street Journal article, “We’re Working More Hours—and Watching More TV.”

Robert Sampson, Harvard University, was quoted in a July 8 Herald Review article, “Trump and the Myth of Immigrant Crime.”

Robert Sampson and William Julius Wilson, both of Harvard University, and Elijah Anderson, Yale University, were quoted in a July 15 International New York Times article, “Who Will Pay the Political Price for Affordable Housing?”

Liana Sayer, University of Maryland, was featured in a July 1 PBS NewsHour article, “How a Time-Use Expert Uses Her Time.”

David Schleifer, Public Agenda, was mentioned in a June 17 Washington Post article, “Why Some Doctors Used to Tout Trans Fats.”

Christine Schwartz, University of Wisconsin, was quoted in a July 16 Bustle article, “Australian Men Are Happier When Their Wives Don’t Work, Says New Study, And Here’s Why That’s Total BS.”

Christian Smith, University of Notre Dame, was mentioned in a June 16 Washington Post article, “Here are Three Reasons Why Southern Baptists are on the Decline” and in a June 16 Christian Science Monitor article, “Giving is Way Up, But for What Reason?”

Jeremy Brooke Straughn, Westminster College, provided commentary for a July 8 WalletHub.com article, “2015’s Most and Least Patriotic States.” He was also interviewed on November 9 2014 for a USA Today article about Cold War Presidential speeches and for an article in the Nikkei Newspaper on Winston Churchill’s “Iron Curtain” speech.

Sarah Thebaud, University of California-Santa Barbara, was quoted and David Pedulla, University of Texas-Austin, Kathleen Gerson, New York University, and Pamela Stone, Hunter College, were mentioned in a July 30 New York Times article, “Millennial Men Aren’t the Dads They Thought They’d Be.”

Ruth Thompson-Miller, University of Dayton, wrote a July 11 Atlantic Black Star article, “Jim Crow: The History of ‘Racial Cleansing’” and mentioned sociologist Joe Feagin, Texas A & M University.

Zeynep Tufekci, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, was mentioned in a June 15 Fortune article, “Would You Rather Have Apple’s Human Editors Filtering Your News or Facebook’s Algorithms?”

Gerry Veenstra, University of British Colombia, was referenced in a June 9 Huffington Post article, “Did the Internet End Cultural Elitism? New Study Shows Snobbery Is Alive and Well.”

William Julius Wilson, Harvard University, was quoted in a May 4 Atlantic Black Star article, “Why Sociologist William Julius Wilson Could Have Predicted Baltimore More than 25 Years Ago.”

Christine Williams, University of Texas-Austin, was quoted in a July 2 Pacific Standard article, “Going to the Strip Club with Sociologists.”

David Williams, Harvard University, was quoted in a July 18 International New York Times article, “Our Racial Moment of Truth.”

Nicholas Wolfinger, University of Utah, was quoted in a July 17 Washington Post article, “The Best Age to Get Married if You Don’t Want to get Divorced,” about his study on the connection between age at marriage and divorce. The study was also covered in Jezebel on July 16, Huffington Post and Cosmopolitan on July 17, Vox, Elle, and CBS News on July 20, Time, People and New York Magazine on July 22, and many other media outlets.

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Awards

Robert Braun, Cornell University, received the ASA Section on the Sociology of Religion Student Paper Award for his paper: “Religious Minorities and Resistance to Genocide: The Collective Rescue of Jews in the Netherlands during the Holocaust,” American Journal of Political Science.

Jay W. Borchert, University of Michigan, received the Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship for his paper, “Mass Incarceration, The Profession of Corrections, and the Way Prison Workers Construct Meanings about their Participation in our Punishment State.”

Rebecca Elliott, University of California-Berkeley, received the Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship for her paper, “Underwater: Floods and the Social Classification, Pricing, and Distribution of the Risks of Climate Change in the United States.”

Elizabeth Hordge-Freeman, University of South Florida, received the McKnight Junior Faculty Fellowship (2015-2016), sponsored by the Florida Education Fund, which awards her a one-year research leave from the University of South Florida.

Anthony Abraham Jack, Harvard University, was chosen to be the 2015-16 National Academy of Education/Spencer Dissertation Fellow. A fellowship award of $27,500.

Wendy Luttrell, Graduate Center-CUNY, received the ACLS Fellowship for her paper, “Care-ful Visions: Re-imagning Education Through Working-Class Children’s Eyes.”

Joshua Meyrowitz, University of New Hampshire, received the 2014 International Communication Association’s Fellows Book Award for his book: No Sense of Place: The Impact of Electronic Media on Social Behavior (Oxford University Press, 1985).

Pamela Prickett, Rice University, received the Community and Urban Sociology Society (CUSS) Best Graduate Student Paper Award for her paper: “Contextualizing Disorder From Within: Perceptions of Physical Disorder in a South Central L.A. African American Mosque.”

Norella Putney and Susan Harris, both of the University of Southern California, received the ASA Section on Sociology of Religion Distinguished Award for their book, Families and Faith: How Religion is Passed Down Across Generations (Oxford University Press, 2013). They share this award with Vern Bengston.

John L. Rury, University of Kansas, received the ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowship for , “The Color of Mind: Why the Origins of the Achievement Gap Matter for Justice.”

Patrick Sharkey, New York University, received the Community and Urban Sociology Society (CUSS) Robert E. Park Award for his book, Stuck in Place: Urban Neighborhoods and the End of the Progress Toward Racial Equality (University of Chicago Press, 2013).

David R. Segal, University of Maryland, received the 2015 Julius E. Uhlaner Award from the American Psychological Association, Division 19 (Society for Military Psychology), for his research on military selection and recruiting, the demography of the American military, and changes in military manpower policy.

Kyla Thomas, Princeton University, received the Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship for, “Hidden (Dis)Advantages of Class: How Cultural Signals of Class Shape Hiring Outcomes.”

Melissa Wilde and Sabrina Danielson, both of University of Pennsylvania, received the ASA Section on the Sociology of Religion Distinguished Article Award for her article, “Fewer and Better Children: Race, Class, Religion and Birth Control Reform in America,” American Journal of Sociology 119:1710-1760.

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People

Riley E. Dunlap, Oklahoma State University, gave the keynote speech at the 10th Italian Environmental Sociology Conference in Italy.

Bill Hadden, University of Maryland, was elected the 2015-16 Treasure to the District of Columbia Sociological Society.

Leslie Irvine, University of Colorado-Boulder, was elected President-Elect of the Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction.

Lynda L. Laughlin, U.S. Census Bureau, was elected the 2015-16 President-Elect to the District of Columbia Sociological Society.

Kris Marsh, University of Maryland-College Park, was elected the 2015-16 Secretary to the District of Columbia Sociological Society.

Avideh Mayville, George Mason University, was elected the 2015-16 Student Liaison Secretary to the District of Columbia Sociological Society.

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New Books

Katrin B. Anacker, Ed., George Mason University, The New American Suburb: Poverty, Race and the Economic Crisis (Ashgate, 2015).

Lonnie Athens, Seton Hall University, Domination and Subjugation in Everyday Life (Transaction, 2015).

Javier Auyero, University of Texas, Philippe Bourgois, University of California-San Francisco, and Nancy Scheper-Hughes, University of California-Berkeley, Eds., Violence at the Urban Margins (Oxford University Press, 2015).

Javier Auyero, University of Texas, Ed., Invisible in Austin: Life and Labor in an American City (University of Texas Press, 2015).

David Abrahamson, Northwestern University, Marcia R. Prior-Miller, Iowa State University, Eds., The Routledge Handbook of Magazine Research: The Future of the Magazine Form (Routledge, 2015).

Estela G. Ballón, California State Polytechnic University-Pomona, Mexican Americans and Education: El saber es poder (University of Arizona Press, 2015).

Tim Bartley, Ohio State University, Sebastian Koos, University of Konstanz, Hiram Samel, University of Oxford, Gustavo Setrini, MIT, and Nikolas Summers, Indiana University, Looking Behind the Label: Global Industries and the Conscientious Consumer (Indiana University Press, 2015).

Colin J. Beck, Pomona College, Radicals, Revolutionaries, and Terrorists (Polity, 2015).

Adele E. Clarke, University of California-San Francisco, Rachel Washburn, Loyola Marymount University, Eds., Situational Analysis in Practice: Mapping Research with Grounded Theory (Left Coast Press, 2015).

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Caught in the Web

SES Indicator Website: The new website www.npb-ses.info provides information on the previous and new versions of the Nam-Powers-Boyd Occupational Status Scale, and assists users in determining how occupational reports can easily be translated into N-P-B occupational status scores.

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