March/April • Volume 43 • Issue 3

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Announcements

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Call for Papers

Publication

Academicians’ Research Center (ARC) announces its call for papers. ARC is an ideal house of publications that accepts and promotes a creative research across the globe without any reservations over religion, nationality, boundaries. The Academicians Research Center, a newly started organization in the field of International Journals, is totally dedicated and committed to maintain the highest standards while considering a paper or article for publication in any one of its international journals. For more information, visit www.arcjournals.org.

Contexts invite submissions for its upcoming special issue: “Good news.” The purpose of this issue is to report on good news research. Focusing on the positive side of sociology instead of focusing on what is critical and what is wrong on various subjects. Examples might include how sociological research helped any form of activism; or stories where research was used to help change a public policy. Stories on crime dropping, or wage gaps shrinking, etc. Deadline: June 1, 2015. For more information, visit www.contexts.org/blog/4889/.

Methados.Revista de Ciencias Sociales is an international scientific publication. It comes out every six months (November-May) in digital format and was created by www.methaodos.org, a research group attached to the Area of Sociology at Rey Juan Carlos University of Madrid. The journal evaluates original content in Spanish and English following the guidelines accepted by the scientific community. Contact: Almudena García Manso at almudena.manso@urjc.es. For more information, visit www.methaodos.org/.

Michigan Sociological Review (MSR) encourages submissions for its autumn 2015 issue. The MSR is the official, peer-reviewed publication of the Michigan Sociological Association. The MSR publishes research articles, research reports, commentaries and book reviews on a range of topics. Deadline: May 15, 2015. To submit, send an e-mail with two files attached: one file with the manuscript that has all author identification removed and a second file with author contact information, author biography, and author acknowledgements. All files should be in .doc or .rtf format (not .pdf) and follow ASA format. Contact: msr@gvsu.edu.

Research in Social Problems and Public Policy is seeking research manuscripts that will be published in Volume 22 in the Spring of 2016. The theme of this volume will focus on problems of expansion of contemporary higher education. In particular, chapters will address problems posed by the idea of democratization of higher education and the consequences of expansion of educational opportunities on social inequality. Deadline: April 20, 2015. Contact: Ted I.K. Youn at yount@bc.edu. For more information, visit www.ashe.ws/images/Call%20for%20Papers%202015%20Research%20SP&PP.pdf.

Social Currents, the official journal of the Southern Sociological Society, is a broad ranging social science journal that focuses on cutting-edge research from all methodological and theoretical orientations with implications for national and international sociological communities. Social Currents consists of a front end devoted to short, theoretical agenda-setting contributions and short empirical and policy-related pieces, ranging anywhere from 1,500 to 4,000 words, and the back end is comprised of standard journal articles. For more information, visit www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal202241/boards#tabview=manuscriptSubmission.

Solving Social Problems invites submissions for its call for book proposals. Solving Social Problems provides a forum for the description and measurement of social problems, with a keen focus on concrete remedies proposed for their solution. Contact: Series Editor, Bonnie Berry, at solving@socialproblems.org or Ashgate Publishing Commissioning Editor, Neil Jordan, at njordan@ashgatepublishing.com.

Social Psychology Quarterly invites submissions for a special issue titled “Methodological Advances and Applications in Social Psychology.” The special issue calls for papers that advance our understanding and application of quantitative applications and formulations, qualitative strategies and developments, and the use of mixed approaches to address theoretically driven social psychological questions in new ways. Deadline: December 15, 2015. Contact: Kathy Charmaz at charmaz@sonoma.edu, Jane Sell at j-sell@tamu.edu, and rserpe@kent.edu. For more information, visit mc.manuscriptcentral.com/spq.

Conferences

Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology (AACS) 2015 Annual Conference, October 8-10, 2015, Montgomery, AL. Theme: “Social Justice from the Local to the Global: Sociology on the Move.” This meeting honors Montgomery’s role in the Civil Rights Movement and highlights AACS’s commitment to the use of sociological practice to effect beneficial social change. Deadline: May 1, 2015. Contact: Karen Albright at AACSsubmission@gmail.com. For more information, visit www.aacsnet.net.

Association for Humanist Sociology (AHS) 2015 Annual Meetings October 21-21, 2015, Portland, OR. Theme: “Locavore Sociology: Challenging Globalization, Embracing the Local.” Interested participants can submit their abstracts, related to the conference theme or to the AHS mission of social justice and activism, through our online portal. Deadline: May 31, 2015. Contact: Anthony E. Ladd at aladd@loyno.edu and Kathleen J. Fitzgerald at fitzy88so@gmail.com. For more information, visit www.humanist-sociology.org/#!portland-2015/c1c3k.

Centre for Research on Families and Relationships (CRFR) International Conference, June 13-15, 2016, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom. Theme: “Unequal Families and Relationships.” Submissions are invited for paper presentations. The conference will address key questions relating to unequal families and relationships. Offering delegates opportunities to attend seven streams, skills taster sessions and take part in a dynamic closing session on creating research impact Deadline: August 31, 2015. For more information, visit www.crfr.ac.uk/international-conference-2016/.

Empirical Investigation of Social Space II International Conference, October 12-14, 2015, University of Bonn, Germany. The objective of this international conference is to bring together social scientists interested in both traditional and modern methods for the construction of social space, in line with the work of Pierre Bourdieu. The purpose of this conference is to explicate and extend Bourdieu’s relationalism in social analysis by elaborating his core concepts and amplifying the methodological precepts and techniques of their deployment. Deadline: June 1, 2015. Contact: socspace@uni-bonn.de.

International Police Executive Symposium 26th Annual Meeting, August 8-12, 2015, Pattaya Beach, Thailand. Theme: “Police Governance and Human Trafficking.” Hosted by the Royal Thai Police Association. Suggested sub-themes for panels, roundtables, and papers include international cooperation, victim trafficking, policing domestic violence, combating organized crime, the role of cyber-domain in trafficking, and working with risk assessment and risk-management prevention. For more information, visit www.ipes.info.

New Data Linkages 2016 Conference, March 2016, Washington, DC. The Social Observatories Coordinating Network is planning a conference to highlight research programs that demonstrate novel linkages between at least two distinct data sources, types, or modalities and which answer an important social scientific question. Submissions must relate empirical results from a study that addresses a specific research question. Deadline: August 20, 2015. Contact: Sandra Hofferth at hofferth@umd.edu. For more information, visit www.socialobservatories.org.

Sexual Violence Conference, September 17-18, 2015, Middlesex University, United Kingdom. Middlesex University is again inviting proposals for papers, symposia and posters addressing topics in all areas of Sexual Violence. Some broad themes include (but are not limited to) sexual offences on public transport, community activism against sexual violence, preventing sexual violence, and new technology and sexual violence. Deadline: April 17, 2015. Contact: Carol Brophy at C.Brophy@mdx.ac.uk.

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Meetings

June 8-11, 2015. International Conference on Computational Social Science, Helsinki, Finland. For more information, visit www.iccss2015.eu/.

June 10-12, 2015. Cambio de Colores - Latinos in the Heartland 2015 Conference, Kansas City, MO. Theme: “Shaping the Future: Leadership for Inclusive Communities.” For more information, visit www.cambiodecolores.org/.

June 10-13, 2015. 6th Annual Expanding the Circle Summer Institute, San Francisco, CA. Theme: “Advancing LGBTQ Initiatives in Higher Education, from the Classroom to the Campus Quad.” Contact: expandingthecircle@ciis.edu. For more information, visit www.ciis.edu/ExapndingTheCircle.

June 25-27, 2015. International Conference on Identity and Nationhood. Dublin, Ireland. Theme: “Pulling Together or Pulling Apart.” For more information, visit www.tcd.ie/Hispanic_Studies/PTPA-conference/.

June 28- July 1, 2015. Clinical Sociology division (RC46) of the International Sociological Association, Johannesburg, South Africa. Theme: “Contours of Violence: Manifestations, Interventions and Social Justice.” Contact: Mariam Seed at Khan at Seedatm@ukzn.ac.za or Tina Uys at tuys@uj.ac.za.

August 21-23, 2015. The Society for the Study of Social Problems (SSSP) 65th Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL. Theme: “Removing the Mask, Lifting the Veil: Race, Class, and Gender in the 21st Century.” For more information, visit www.sssp1.org.

October 23-24, 2015. A Critical Moment: Sex/Gender Research at the Intersection of Culture, Brain, & Behavior, 6th Interdisciplinary Conference of The Foundation for Psychocultural Research, Los Angeles, CA. Theme: “Issues at the Intersection of Sex/Gender, Culture, Brain, and Behavior.” Contact: Constance Cummings at cummings08@gmail.com. For more information, visit www.thefpr.org/conference2015/registration.php.

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Funding

Funds for Research Conferences on Research Integrity Department of Health and Human Services In accordance with 42 C.F.R. Part 93, the Office of Research Integrity (ORI) seeks to support conferences to develop multidisciplinary networks to build upon existing evidence-based research and stimulate innovative approaches to preventing research misconduct and promoting research integrity. ORI is especially interested in supporting conferences that lead to extramural grant applications on research integrity and peer-reviewed publications. Deadline: May 15, 2015. For more information, visit www.grants.gov/custom/viewOppDetails.jsp?oppId=273932.

Law School Admission Council (LSAC) Research Grant Program funds research on a wide variety of topics related to the mission of LSAC. To be eligible for funding, a research project must inform either the process of selecting law students or legal education itself in a demonstrable way. Proposals will be judged on the importance of the questions addressed, their relevance to the mission of LSAC, the quality of the research designs, and the capacity of the researchers to carry out the project. Deadline: August 15, 2015. For more information, visit www.lsac.org/lsacresources/grants/lsac-research.

The Office of Research Integrity (ORI) has a program of research, dictated by regulation that focuses on learning more about improving research integrity among those receiving government funding. For more information, visit www.ori.hhs.gov/division-education-and-integrity.

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Fellowships

The American Institute of Indian Studies announces its 2015 fellowship competition and invites applications from scholars who wish to conduct their research in India. Junior fellowships are awarded to PhD candidates to conduct research for their dissertations in India for up to 11 months. Senior fellowships are awarded to scholars who hold the PhD degree for up to nine months of research in India. Deadline: July 1, 2015. Contact: (773) 702-8638 or aiis@uchicago.edu. For more information, visit www.indiastudies.org.

Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a National Science Foundation (NSF) wide activity that offers the foundation’s most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education, and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations. NSF encourages submission of CAREER proposals from junior faculty members at all CAREER-eligible organizations and especially encourages women, members of underrepresented minority groups, and persons with disabilities to apply. Deadline: July 23, 2015. For more information, visit www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15555/nsf15555.htm.

The Greater Good Science Center at the University of California-Berkeley is pleased to announce its Gratitude Postdoctoral Fellowship program. Three fellowships, each for two years of NIH-level salary support and up to $10,000 in research costs per year will be awarded to postdoctoral applicants with winning proposals to work in tandem with one of the gratitude faculty researchers affiliated with this initiative. The funding period is September 1, 2015, through August 31, 2017. Deadline: August 31, 2015. For more information, visit www.greatergood.berkeley.edu/expandinggratitude/gratitude_postdoc_fellowship.

The Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study (NIAS) is accepting applications for its fellowship in the Humanities and Social Sciences. This is an opportunity for those who wish to spend a period of time during the academic year 2016-17 to conduct research as a part of the NIAS community. A NIAS fellowship offers time to think and write as well as providing space to generate ideas and engage in cross-disciplinary collaboration with colleagues from around the world. We invite scholars from the humanities, the social sciences, and those working at the interface with other disciplines. Deadline: April 15, 2015. For more information, visit www.nias.knaw.nl/fellowships.

The Rotary Peace Centers of The Rotary Foundation is currently recruiting applicants for the 2016 Rotary Peace Fellowship. The fellowship provides academic and practical training to prepare scholars for leadership roles in solving today’s global challenges. Since 2002, Rotary Peace Centers has provided nearly 900 social change leaders with peace and conflict resolution education and field experience. Our alumni work in over 100 countries with organizations ranging from grassroots peace initiatives in Africa to the United Nations. Deadline: May 31, 2015. For more information, visit www.rotary.org/en/peace-fellowships.

Stiftung Deutsch-Amerikanische Wissenschaftsbeziehungen (SDAW/Foundation German-American Academic Relations) is prepared to fund research groups composed of German and North American scholars, and, where appropriate, other European scholars, who propose to explore topics of particular relevance to the transatlantic relationship. Research projects may focus on international or domestic topics; comparisons with cases outside the U.S.-European context are welcome, as are proposals that seek to open up new methodological approaches. The participation of younger scholars is particularly welcome. For more information, visit www.sdaw.net/.

Visiting Scholars Program at the Russell Sage Foundation provides a unique opportunity for select scholars in the social, economic and behavioral sciences to pursue their research and writing at the Foundation’s New York headquarters. The Foundation annually awards up to 17 residential fellowships to select scholars in the social sciences who are at least several years beyond the PhD. Visiting Scholar positions begin September 1 and run through June 30. Deadline: June 30, 2015. Contact: James Wilson at james@rsage.org. For more information, visit www.russellsage.org/how-to-apply#scholars.

The Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study (NIAS) is accepting applications for its fellowship in the Humanities and Social Sciences. This is an opportunity for those who wish to spend a period of time during the academic year 2016-17 to conduct research as a part of the NIAS community. A NIAS fellowship offers time to think and write as well as providing space to generate ideas and engage in cross-disciplinary collaboration with colleagues from around the world. We invite scholars from the humanities, the social sciences, and those working at the interface with other disciplines. Deadline: April 15, 2015. For more information, visit www.nias.knaw.nl/fellowships.

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In The News

Christopher Bail, Duke University, was quoted in a February 6 Atlantic column, “What I Learned Trying to Write a Muslim-American Cop Show for HBO.”

Loretta E. Bass, University of Oklahoma, was quoted in a January 22 KGOU.org article and interviewed on KGOU about African immigrant families in “post-racial” France.

Howard Becker was profiled for his lifetime of sociological research in a January 12 New Yorker article, “The Outside Game.”

Mabel Berezin, Cornell University, wrote a January 10 CNN.com op-ed, “Attack Will Empower Europe’s Far Right.”

Miriam Boeri, Bentley University, wrote December 5 and January 13 Conversation articles, “Being Drug Free Shouldn’t Be a Requirement to Receive Housing,” and “Can Medical Marijuana Curb the Heroin Epidemic?.” Raw Story and LiveScience.com published the medical marijuana article on January 13 and January 14, respectively.

Chad Broughton, University of Chicago, was interviewed January 28 on NPR’s “Marketplace” and featured in an article on the show’s website about his book, Boom, Bust, Exodus: The Rust Belt, the Maquilas, and a Tale of Two Cities.

Deborah Carr, Rutgers University, was quoted in a February 13 Washington Post article, “This Valentine’s Day, Let’s Forget It.” The article also appeared in a number of other media outlets, including The Province on February 13 and The Bulletin on February 14.

Karen A. Cerulo, Rutgers University, was quoted in an October 27 Post and Courier article about the use of social media in celebrity break-ups and in February 11 and February 18 New York Daily News articles, “Brian Williams’ Trustworthiness Ranking Drops 812 Places: Survey,” and “Where Did A-Rod’s Apology Go Wrong? Public Relations Experts Count the Ways.”

Elic Chan, University of British Columbia, was quoted in a March 17 CTV Vancouver article, “Funny Joke or Racist Stereotype? ‘Chinese Driver’ Stickers Spark Debate.”

Dalton Conley, New York University, was interviewed on January 21 on the NPR/WBUR radio show, “Here & Now,” about income inequality between siblings.

Marianne Cooper, Stanford University, was interviewed about her book, Cut Adrift: Families in Insecure Times, on September 9 on NPR’s “Marketplace” and on CSPAN’s “Book TV,” as well as on September 11 on Wisconsin Public Radio’s “The Kathleen Dunn Show.” She was also quoted in a September 10 San Francisco Business Times article, “‘Lean In’ Lead Researcher: Sharing Economy Doesn’t Bring Us Closer to the American Dream.” She was also was featured in a November 5 Failure Magazine Q&A centered around her book, Cut Adrift: Families in Insecure Times and was quoted in a November 11 USA Today article, “Struggling in the Shadow of Silicon Valley Wealth.”

Amanda M. Czerniawski, Temple University, was quoted in a January 14 Pacific Standard article, “Plus-Sized Fashion and the Sociologist’s Gaze,” which is centered around her new book, Fashioning Fat: Inside Plus-Size Modeling.

Elaine Howard Ecklund, Rice University, was quoted in a March 15 Religion News Service article, “God Knows, Evangelicals Are More Science-Friendly Than You Think,” and a March 16 Scientific American article, “Can Science Find Common Ground with Evangelicals?” The Religion News Service article also appeared in The Huffington Post and the Deseret News on March 16.

Claude Fischer, University of California-Berkeley, was quoted in a March 16 Slate article, “A Telephone Map of the United States Shows Where You Could Call Using Ma Bell in 1910.”

Paul K. Gellert, University of Tennessee, was quoted in a January 13 New York Times article, “In China, Projects to Make Great Wall Feel Small.”

Kevin Fox Gotham, Tulane University, was interviewed January 13 on “Central Standard” on KCUR (89.3) in Kansas City about the second edition of his book, Race, Real Estate, and Uneven Development: The Kansas City Experience, 1900-2010.

Arlie Russell Hochschild, University of California-Berkeley, was mentioned in a January 28 Week article, “The Subversive Brilliance of Marshawn Lynch.”

Carole Joffe, University of California-San Francisco, was quoted in a February 10 Bloomberg article, “Grisly Language Propels Kansas Abortion Bill as U.S. Model.”

Nathan Jurgenson, University of Maryland, was quoted in a March 12 Pacific Standard article, “Mounting a Critique of Online Identity, in Person.”

Arne L. Kalleberg, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, was quoted in a March 6 Los Angeles Times article about the reasons for the sluggish wage growth despite the robust increase in jobs in February.

Amelia Karraker, Iowa State University, was quoted and Kenzie Latham, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, was mentioned in a March 6 Washington Post article about their recent Journal of Health and Social Behavior study, “In Sickness and in Health? Physical Illness as a Risk Factor for Marital Dissolution in Later Life.” The study was also covered in a number of other media outlets, including the New York Post and The Telegraph on March 4; the Daily Mail, The Huffington Post, and New York magazine on March 5; and the Deseret News on March 6.

Michael Kimmel, Stony Brook University- SUNY, was quoted in a March 9 Washington Post article, “A Sociologist’s Cause: Guys, Be Better Men.”

Peter Kivisto, Augustana College, was interviewed January 26 on the Voice of Moscow radio’s afternoon call-in program about the future of citizenship. Callers were especially interested in the growing importance of dual citizenship and in the competition among nation-states for skilled workers.

George C. Klein, Oakton Community College, was interviewed on September 24, December 15, and January 9 on LBC Radio, London about hostages being held in Syria by Islamic fundamentalists, the hostage incident in Sydney, Australia, and the terrorist attacks in Paris, France, respectively.

Eric Klinenberg, New York University, was mentioned in a March 2 TIME.com article, “Aziz Ansari on His New Book and How Texting Is Ruining Our Relationships,” and a March 10 Guardian article, “Aziz Ansari Teams Up With Sociologist for Relationship Book Modern Romance.”

Ross Koppel, University of Pennsylvania, was quoted in a February 3 USA Today article, “Debate Heats Up Over Safety of Electronic Health Records,” and in a February 8 Morning Call article, “Epic Change for Lehigh Valley Health Network and St. Luke’s.”

C.N. Le, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, was quoted in a March 17 NBCNews.com article, “For Asian Americans, Wealth Stereotypes Don’t Fit Reality.”

Chaeyoon Lim, University of Wisconsin-Madison, was quoted in a February 11 Medical Daily article, “Mental Health, Intelligence, And Wealth: What Science Says About The Religious vs. Non-Religious.”

James Loewen, Catholic University of America, was mentioned in a February 5 Star Tribune article, “Edina’s Racist Past is Focus of Wikipedia ‘Edit War.’”

D. Michael Lindsay, Gordon College, was mentioned in a March 6 New Republic article, “It Doesn’t Matter If Your Kid Doesn’t Get Into Harvard.”

Jonathan London, City University of Hong Kong, was quoted in a February 21 New York Times article, “Punch Lines and Laughs as TV Show in Vietnam Mocks Government Policy.”

Tom Macias, University of Vermont, was quoted in a March 7 Vermont Public Radio article, “In Vermont, A Hyper-Local Online Forum Brings Neighbors Together,” and featured in a Vermont Public Radio story about the same subject.

Kris Macomber, Meredith College, was a guest on January 30 on the PBS show To The Contrary, where she was interviewed about her research on how male allies in anti-violence against women’s campaign work. Macomber was also quoted in a February 24 Guardian article, “Why More Men Should Fight for Women’s Rights.”

Wendy Manning, Bowling Green State University, and Sara McLanahan, Princeton University, were quoted in a March 10 Wall Street Journal article, “U.S. Sees Rise in Unmarried Parents.”

Ashley Mears, Boston University, was mentioned in a March 17 Forbes article, “Why Gisele’s Reported Runway Retirement Won’t Ruin Her Earnings.”

Ruth Milkman, Graduate Center-City University of New York, was mentioned in a February 5 Fortune article, “What Would it Cost to Have Mandatory, Paid Parental Leave?”

Alexandra Murphy, University of Michigan, was quoted in a March 6 Pacific Standard article, “We Need to Start Thinking About Transportation Like We Do Food or Housing.”

Kari Norgaard, University of Oregon, was mentioned in a March 10 Pacific Standard article, “What Voldemort and Climate Change Have in Common.”

Timothy O’Brien, University of Evansville, was quoted and Shiri Noy, University of Wyoming, was mentioned in a January 29 Religion News Service article about their recent American Sociological Review study, “Traditional, Modern, and Post-Secular Perspectives on Science and Religion in the United States.” The study was covered in a number of other media outlets, including The Washington Post, The Huffington Post, LiveScience.com, Yahoo!News, the Tulsa World, and National Geographic on January 29.

Guðmundur Oddsson, Northern Michigan University, was quoted in a February 18 Washington Post article, “5 Countries Where Police Officers Do Not Carry Firearms — and It Works Well.”

Mary Pattillo, Northwestern University, Andrew Cherlin, Johns Hopkins University, and Michèle Lamont, Harvard University, were quoted in a March 15 NBCNews.com article, “Class in America: Identities Blur as Economy Changes.”

Silvia Pedraza, University of Michigan, was quoted in June 1 Crain’s Detroit Business articles, “Built by Immigrants: Foreign-Born Workers Integral Part of Detroit’s History, Economy,” and “India Leads All Nations in Sending People to Detroit.”

Michael Pollard, RAND Corporation, co-authored a January 3 Newsweek article, “Gay Marriage Gains Support, But It’s Still a Partisan Issue,” about his research.

Jack Nusan Porter, Harvard University, wrote a January 23 article in The Jewish Daily Forward on the sociology and politics of the Jews of Wisconsin as part of the publication’s series on Jews in the United States.

Brian Powell, Indiana University, was mentioned in March 3 Courier-Journal article, “Same-Sex Marriage: Why People Really Oppose It.”

Robert Putnam, Harvard University, and Andrew Cherlin, Johns Hopkins University, were quoted in a March 16 Slate article, “Yes, Culture Helped Kill the Two-Parent Family. And Liberals Shouldn’t Be Afraid to Admit It.”

Jennifer A. Reich, University of Colorado-Denver, was quoted in a January 28 New Republic article, “Don’t Blame Anti-Vaxxers for the Measles Outbreak. Blame American Culture.”

Lauren Rivera, Northwestern University, was quoted in a February 3 Bloomberg View column, “Would You Hire the Super Bowl Hero?” The article also appeared in a number of other media outlets, including the Chicago Tribune on February 4 and The Fresno Bee on February 5.

David Roelfs, University of Louisville, and George Ritzer, University of Maryland, were quoted in a February 11 Agence France-Press article, “U.S. Shopping Mall Culture — Dying or Just Changing?” The article appeared in a number of other media outlets, including the Daily Mail and Nigeria’s The Guardian on February 11.

Scott Schieman, University of Toronto, was quoted in a February 10 CBC News article, “Shorter Work Week Comes With Many Downsides, Says Canadian Sociologist.”

Pepper Schwartz, University of Washington, was quoted in a January 28 Huffington Post article, “When You Want Sex And Your Partner Doesn’t,” a February 11 Seattle Times article, “Sexy, Viral Novel Series Brings Seattle ‘50 Shades of Green,’” a February 12 Scientific American article, “Terms of Endearment: Why Do We Use Pet Names in Relationships?” She was quoted in a February 14 Today.com article, “Why You Should Ditch Your Tinder and Text Addiction for Valentine’s Day,” a February 18 Florida Today article, “‘Fifty Shades’ Increasing Sales at Brevard’s Fairvilla,” and a March 2 Huffington Post article, “How to Plan a Romantic Rendezvous During Your Life After 50.”

Jennifer Silva, Bucknell University, was quoted in a March 16 NBCNews.com article, “Middle-Class Betrayal? Why Working Hard Is No Longer Enough in America.”

Simon I. Singer, Northeastern University, was interviewed in a regional NPR program about his recently published book, America’s Safest City: Delinquency and Modernity in Suburbia. The interview was broadcast January 5 from Buffalo’s WBFO station.

David Smilde, Tulane University, was quoted in a March 10 Reuters article, “U.S. Sanctions May Be Godsend for Struggling Venezuelan Leader.” Yahoo!News also published the article on March 10.

Sameer Srivastava, University of California-Berkeley, was quoted and Christopher Liu, University of Toronto, was mentioned in a February 10 Mother Jones article, “The Closer Republican and Democratic Senators Sit, the More They Disagree,” about their recent American Sociological Review study.

Sarah Thébaud, University of California-Santa Barbara, was quoted and David S. Pedulla, University of Texas-Austin, was mentioned in a January 23 Huffington Post article about their recent American Sociological Review study, “Can We Finish the Revolution? Gender, Work-Family Ideals, and Institutional Constraint.” The study was covered in a number of other media outlets, including Cosmopolitan on January 20, the Chicago Tribune on January 20, the Deseret News on January 22, NPR.org on January 23, and Salon on January 26.

Reuben J. Thomas, University of New Mexico, was quoted and Michael Rosenfeld, Stanford University, was mentioned in a February 8 Albuquerque Journal article, “Couples Navigate Online Dating.”

Stewart Tolnay, University of Washington, was mentioned in a February 10 Al Jazeera America article, “New Details Emerge on Lynchings in Jim Crow South.”

Christopher Uggen, University of Minnesota, was quoted and Sarah Shannon, University of Georgia, was mentioned in a March 1 New York Times article, “Out of Trouble, Out of Work.”

William Velez, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, was interviewed and appeared as an expert commentator for a documentary on Italians in Milwaukee that aired February 23 on Milwaukee Public Television.

Sudhir Venkatesh, Columbia University, was mentioned in a February 2 Associated Press article, “Mark Zuckerberg Makes 3rd Book Club Pick.”  The article appeared in a number of other media outlets, including The New York Times, The Charlotte Observer, and ABC News on February 2. He was also quoted in a March 14 Wichita Eagle op-ed on the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity.

Janet Vertesi, Princeton University, was quoted in a January 15 San Francisco Chronicle article, “Google Halts Glass Sales to Reboot Vision After Awful Debut.”

Lisa Wade, Occidental College, wrote a March 3 Pacific Standard article, “The Children of the Prison Boom,” which quotes Christopher Wildeman, Cornell University, and Sara Wakefield, Rutgers University, and mentions Kristin Turney, University of California-Irvine. Wade also wrote a March 12 Pacific Standard article, “The Myth of Teenage Binge Drinking,” which quotes Karen Sternheimer, University of Southern California.

Lisa Slattery Walker, University of North Carolina-Charlotte, was quoted in a February 13 BBC.com article, “The Surprising Downsides of Being Drop Dead Gorgeous.”

Elaine Wethington, Cornell University, and Barbara Mitchell, Simon Fraser University, were mentioned in a February 12 Scientific American article, “Science Debunks Midlife Myths.”

W. Brad Wilcox, University of Virginia, was quoted and Sheela Kennedy, University of Minnesota, Michael Pollard, RAND Corporation, and Kathleen Mullan Harris, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, were mentioned in a January 22 Huffington Post article, “Will Living Together Without Marriage Damage Kids?”

Robb Willer, Stanford University, and his research were mentioned in a January 27 Pacific Standard article, “How to Convince Men to Help the Poor.”  He also wrote a March 1 New York Times op-ed, “Is the Environment a Moral Cause?” He was also quoted in a February 13 Vallejo Times-Herald article, “Why the Hearts and Flowers on Valentine’s Day?”

William Julius Wilson, Harvard University, was quoted in a March 12 New York Times op-ed, “When Liberals Blew It.” The op-ed also appeared in a number of other media outlets, including the Sun Herald on March 12 and The Fresno Bee on March 15.

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Awards

Jeannine A. Gailey, Texas Christian University, received the Women and Gender Studies Research and Creative Activity Research Award for her book, The Hyper(in)visible Fat Woman: Weight and Gender Discourse in Contemporary Society (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014).

Lisa N. Hickman, Grand Valley State University, received the 2014 Marvin Olsen Award for Service to Sociology in the State of Michigan from the Michigan Sociological Association.

Howard Kimeldorf, University of Michigan, received the 2014 Charles Horton Cooley Award for Outstanding Scholarship from the Michigan Sociological Association.

Beverly Lindsay, University College London, has been awarded a multi-year Ford Foundation Grant (as Principal Investigator and Co-Director) for the Institute: University Leadership and Agents of Change in Post Conflict and Transitional Societies, University of California.

Aaron M. McCright, Michigan State University, received the 2014 Larry T. Reynolds Award for the Outstanding Teaching of Sociology from the Michigan Sociological Association.

Jonathan Stringfield, University of Illinois-Chicago, was awarded the National Science Foundation’s Doctoral Dissertation Research Grant for his project titled “Identity and Audience in Social Media.”

Paige Sweet, University of Illinois-Chicago, was awarded the National Science Foundation Doctoral Dissertation Research Grant for her project titled “Trauma, Domestic Violence, and Hybrid Medicalization.”

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People

Michael Augustin Faia, College of William & Mary, performs his one-act play, Am I Smith or Jones?, at Subprimal Poetry Art (Winter 2014-15). He plays three parts, one of which is a woman—a true Goffmanian challenge. For more information, visit www.subprimal.com, and click on “Issues.”

Guillermina Jasso, New York University, was elected Chair of the Social Statistics Section of the American Statistical Association. She serves as Chair-Elect in 2015, Chair in 2016, and Past Chair in 2017. She also was elected to a four-year term as a Member-at-Large of the Section on Social, Economic and Political Sciences (Section K) of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), 2015-2019.

Joseph A. Kotarba, Texas State University, will deliver the annual Peter Hall Lecture at the Midwest Sociological Society meetings in Kansas City, MO, on March 28, 2015. His lecture is “From Basic to Applied to Policy: Teaming in Symbolic Interactionism.”

Rachel Kraus, Ball State University, was elected Secretary to the North-Central Sociological Association.

Melinda Messineo, Ball State University, was elected Vice President-Elect to the North-Central Sociological Association.

Stephen J. Morewitz, California State University-East Bay, research on endangered runaway and homeless youth was featured in a CSUEB NewsBlog on February 16, 2015. Stephen’s research will be published in the forthcoming book: Runaway and Homeless Youth: New Research and Clinical Perspectives (Springer, 2016).

Jack Nusan Porter, Harvard University, gave a public speech March 3, 2015, at the Princeton Theological Seminary in New Jersey on the topic: “Ten Myths on Jewish Resistance During the Holocaust.”

Debra Swanson, Hope College, was elected President-Elect to the North-Central Sociological Association.

William Julius Wilson, Harvard University, will spend four months as the Kluge Chair in American Law and Governance, revisiting his past research on race and inequality through the lens of recent events.

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New Books

Robert Adelman, University at Buffalo-SUNY, and Christopher Mele, University at Buffalo-SUNY, Race, Space, and Exclusion: Segregation and Beyond in Metropolitan America (Routledge, 2015).

Melanie E. Bush, Adelphi University, Roderick D. Bush, St. John’s University, Tensions in the American Dream: Rhetoric, Reverie, or Reality (Temple University Press, 2015).

Kasturi DasGupta, Georgian Court University, Introducing Social Stratification: The Causes and Consequences of Inequality (Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2015).

Mary Patrice Erdmans and Timothy Black, both of Case Western Reserve University, On Becoming a Teen Mom: Life Before Pregnancy (University of California Press, 2015).

Matthew B. Flynn, Georgia Southern University, Pharmaceutical Autonomy and Public Health in Latin America (Routledge, 2015).

Theodoros Fouskas, New York College-Greece, and Vassileios Tsevrenis, Marangopoulos Foundation for Human Rights, Eds., Contemporary Immigration in Greece: A Sourcebook (European Public Law Organization Publications, 2014).

William Frey, Brookings Institution, Diversity Explosion: How New Racial Demographics Are Remaking America (Brookings Institution Press, 2014).

Jeannine A. Gailey, Texas Christian University, The Hyper(in)visible Fat Woman: Weight and Gender Discourse in Contemporary Society (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014).

Robert Granfield, University of Buffalo, and Craig Reinarman, University of California, Eds., Expanding Addiction: Critical Essays (Routledge, 2014).

Max Haller, University of Graz, Ethnic Stratification and Income Inequality around the World: The End of Exploitation and Exclusion? (Ashgate, 2015).

Deborah A. Harris, and Patti Giuffre, both of Texas State University, Taking the Heat: Women Chefs and Gender Inequality in the Professional Kitchen (Rutgers University Press, 2015).

Sue Ellen Henry, Bucknell University, Children’s Bodies in Schools: Corporeal Performances of Social Class (Palgrave, 2014).

Susanne Jonas, University of California-Santa Cruz, and Nestor Rodríguez, University of Texas-Austin, Guatemala-U.S. Migration: Transforming Regions. (University of Texas Press, 2014). 

Thomas J. Keil, Arizona State University, and Jacqueline M. Keil, Kean University, Anthracite’s Demise and the Post-Coal Economy of Northeastern Pennsylvania (Lehigh University Press, 2014).

Kristen M. Lavelle, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, Whitewashing the South: White Memories of Segregation and Civil Rights (Rowman & Littlefield, 2014).

Susan Archer Mann, University of New Orleans, and Ashly Suzanne Patterson, Southeastern Louisiana University, Reading Feminist Theory: From Modernity to Postmodernity (Oxford University Press, 2015). 

William Marisiglio, University of Florida, Kendra Siler-Marsiglio, CommunityHealth IT at WellFlorida Council, The Male Clock: A Futuristic Novel about a Fertility Crisis, Gender Politics, and Identity (Sense Publishers, 2015).

Michael A. Messner, Max A. Greenberg, both of University of Southern California, and Tal Peretz, Seattle University, Some Men: Feminist Allies and the Movement to End Violence Against Women (Oxford University Press, 2015).

Aidan McGarry, University of Brighton, and James Jasper, Graduate Center-CUNY, The Identity Dilemma: Social Movements and Collective Identity (Temple University Press, 2015).

Jack Nusan Porter, Harvard University, Confronting History and Holocaust (Spencer Press, 2014).

Roland Robertson, University of Pittsburgh, European Glocalization in Global Context (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014).

Jeffrey Ian Ross, University of Baltimore, American Indians at Risk, (ABC-Clio, 2014).

Edward C. Royce, Rollins College, Poverty and Power: The Problem of Structural Inequality, Second Edition (Rowman & Littlefield, 2015); and Classical Social Theory and Modern Society: Marx, Durkheim, Weber (Rowman & Littlefield, 2015).

Dan Ryan, Mills College, Ghosts of Organizations Past: Communities as Organizations as Settings for Change (Temple University Press, 2015).

Simon I. Singer, Northeastern University, America’s Safest City: Delinquency and Modernity in Suburbia (New York University Press, 2014).

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Caught on the Web

General Social Survey (GSS) new cumulative file and its codebook documentation covering 1972-2014 are now available on the GSS website. For more information, visit www3.norc.org/GSS+Website/

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Other Organizations

Midwest Sociological Society seeks an individual with a distinguished scholarly record and editorial experience to be the next editor of The Sociological Quarterly (TSQ). Since 1960, TSQ’s contributors, peer-reviewers, advisory editors, and readers have made it one of the leading generalist journals in the field. Editing TSQ is a unique and rewarding professional responsibility that brings visibility and distinction to a department and university. Contact: MidwestSS@centurytel.net or (319) 338-5247. For more information, visit www.TheMss.org.

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Summer Programs

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) Summer Program, the ICPSR Summer Program in Quantitative Methods of Social Research is internationally recognized as a preeminent learning environment for basic and advanced training in social science research methodologies and technologies. Deadline: April 30, 2015. For more information, visit www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/sumprog/.

LearnLab is accepting applications to its summer school on advanced learning technologies at Carnegie Mellon University.  An intensive one-week summer school on advanced learning technologies and technology-enhanced learning experiments. The summer school will provide a conceptual background and considerable hands-on experience in developing, running, and analyzing technology-enhanced learning experiments. Deadline: May 14, 2015. For more information, visit www.learnlab.org/opportunities/summer/application.php.

RAND Summer Institute, July 6-9, 2015, Santa Monica, CA. Two conferences addressing critical issues facing our aging population: Mini-Medical School for Social Scientists; Workshop on the Demography, Economics, Psychology, and Epidemiology of Aging. Interested researchers can apply for financial support covering travel and accommodations. For more information, visit www.rand.org/labor/aging/rsi.html.

The Russian, East European, and Eurasian Center (REEEC) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is issuing a Call for Applications for the 2015 Summer Research Laboratory, held at the University of Illinois. The Summer Research Laboratory (SRL) on Russia, Eastern Europe, and Eurasia is open to all scholars of sociology with research interests in the Russian, East European and Eurasian region for eight weeks during the summer months, June 15 - August 8, 2015. Deadline: April 15, 2015. For more information, visit www.reeec.illinois.edu/srl/?utm_source=ASA&utm_medium=Footnotes&utm_campaign=SRL2015.

Qualitative Research Summer Intensive, July 27-31, 2015, Chapel Hill, NC.  ResearchTalk and the University of North Carolina’s Odum Institute will co-host this opportunity for researchers to learn qualitative techniques and theories from and discuss contemporary practice issues with leading scholars in the field of qualitative inquiry.  10 percent discount code ASA-QRSI2015.  Contact: info@researchtalk.com. For more information, visit www.researchtalk.com.

University of Maryland Consortium on Race, Gender and Ethnicity is pleased to announce a five-day 2015 summer Intersectional Qualitative Research Methods Institute (IQRMI). Participants in the IQRMI will learn through hands-on training using their own research projects. Projects are expected to contribute to the knowledge base of at least one of the three program areas that are focused on helping America’s children have brighter futures. Registration is $645. Deadline: March 16, 2015. For more information, visit www.crge.umd.edu/institute/files/institute.pdf.

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