American Sociological Association

Search

Search

The search found 4592 results in 0.018 seconds.

Search results

  1. ASA Amicus Brief Supports Suit to Overturn Virginia’s Gay Marriage Ban

    The American Sociological Association (ASA) filed an amicus brief with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit today supporting the fight to overturn Virginia’s gay marriage ban and continuing its now 14-month effort to highlight the overwhelming body of social science research that confirms “children fare just as well” when raised by same-sex or heterosexual parents. The Fourth Circuit is scheduled to consider the lawsuit challenging the ban in the near future.

  2. ASA requests that American Community Survey remain mandatory

    Honorable Danny Davis, Ranking Member
    Subcommittee on Health Care, District of Columbia,
    Census and National Archives
    Committee on Oversight and Government Reform
    Washington, DC 20515

    Dear Ranking Member Davis:

    The American Sociological Association appreciates the opportunity to share our views about the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey (ACS), an innovation that has greatly benefited social science researchers, policy makers, and the communities they both serve.

  3. Study Identifies ‘Bonus Effect’ for Certain Multiracial Daters

    While previous research has documented the existence of a racial hierarchy within the dating world with white women and men on top, a new study finds that in certain circumstances multiracial daters are actually seen as more desirable than individuals from all other racial groups, including whites.

  4. Sociologists to Take In-Depth Look at Chicago During ASA Annual Meeting

    At the American Sociological Association's 110th Annual Meeting, Chicago will be the subject of several regional spotlight sessions in which leading sociologists will present research on and discuss topics related to the city, including public education, social inequality, criminal justice, migration, and gentrification.

  5. Childhood Adversity Launches Lifelong Relationship and Health Disadvantage for Black Men

    Greater childhood adversity helps to explain why black men are less healthy than white men, and some of this effect appears to operate through childhood adversity’s enduring influence on the relationships black men have as adults, according to a new study in the March issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

  6. Childhood Poverty, Parental Abuse Cost Adults Their Health for Years to Come

    Growing up in poverty or being abused by parents can lead to accumulated health problems later in life, according to research from Purdue University.

    "Childhood disadvantage has long-term health consequences—much longer than most of us realize," said Kenneth F. Ferraro, distinguished professor of sociology. "A novel aspect of this study is that childhood disadvantage was linked to the onset of new health problems decades later."

  7. More Than Half of 'Children' Misperceive or Reject Parents' Political Party Affiliations

    A new study finds that more than half of all "children" in the U.S. either misperceive or reject their parents' political party affiliations.

  8. Children of Undocumented Mexican Immigrants Have Heightened Risk of Behavior Problems

    Children of undocumented Mexican immigrants have a significantly higher risk of behavior problems than their co-ethnic counterparts with documented or naturalized citizen mothers, according to a new study.

    The difficulties come in two forms: sadness or social withdrawal — what the authors refer to as internalizing behavior problems — and issues such as aggressiveness towards others — which the authors call externalizing behavior problems.   

  9. Study Suggests Earning a College Degree Before, But Not After, Getting Married Protects Against Obesity

    People who earn a college degree before getting married are much less likely to become obese than those who graduate from college after getting married, according to a new study.